Episode 63 — We Need to Talk About El Salvador (Feat. Mario Gómez and Oscar Salguero) — Crypto Critics’ Corner

Crypto Critics' Corner

We Need to talk about El Salvador (Feat. Mario Gómez and Oscar Salguero) Crypto Critics' Corner

Today Bennett and Cas are joined by two Salvadoran natives – Mario Gómez, a developer who was arrested in El Salvador for voicing criticism about the Bitcoin bill, and Oscar Salguero, a senior software engineer who has been traveling to and from El Salvador, testing the limits of the cryptocurrency remittance services. Para nuestros oyentes en español, hay una transcripción disponible aquí: https://cryptocriticscorner.com/2022/03/29/episode-63-we-need-to-talk-about-el-salvador-feat-mario-gomez-and-oscar-salguero/#spanish-transcript This is an incredible episode. If you want to follow Mario on Twitter, please click here: https://twitter.com/mxgxw_alpha If you want to follow Oscar on Twitter, please click here: https://twitter.com/OscarSalguero (or his website https://oscarsalguero.dev) Here are some of the articles and stats referenced during the episode: https://video.vice.com/da/video/gangs-of-el-salvador-part-1/5633b710023f0a102ad05e14 https://www.vice.com/en/article/m7vk5x/nayib-bukele-ms13-murder-rate https://camarasal.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/SondeoEmpresarial35422_FINAL10032022.pdf https://diario.elmundo.sv/economia/solo-el-14-de-las-empresas-reporta-ventas-en-bitcoin-segun-encuesta This episode was recorded on Thursday, March 24th, 2022

Cas Piancey and Bennett Tomlin are joined by Mario Gómez and Oscar Salguero to discuss the reality of Bitcoin in El Salvador. We talk about Bukele’s approval, the actions of the gangs, how well Chivo works (badly), and try to understand what is really going on. 

Other episodes mentioned in this show:

If you want to follow Mario on Twitter, please click here: https://twitter.com/mxgxw_alpha

If you want to follow Oscar on Twitter, please click here: https://twitter.com/OscarSalguero (or his website https://oscarsalguero.dev)

Here are some of the articles and stats referenced during the episode:

If you would like to subscribe to my free weekly newsletter then please go here.

If you want the posts from this blog delivered to your inbox:

I also have a Discord server that you can join here.

English transcript:

Cas Piancey:
Welcome back everyone. I am Cas Piancey, and I am joined, as usual, by my partner in crime, Mr. Bennett Tomlin. How are you doing today?
Bennett Tomlin:
Tired, but pretty good. How are you, Cas?
Cas Piancey:
Ah. I'm good, so that's good. But we are joined by two very special guests today, Oscar Salguero and Mario Gomez, both who are much more aware of what's going on in El Salvador, than Bennett and I, who have tried to get an idea of how Nayib has been behaving, and what this Bitcoin legal tender has meant for the country of El Salvador, in Central America. But welcome, both of you. It's great to have you on. Oscar, let's start with you. How did you get into all of this? How did you get into El Salvador, this Bitcoin stuff, all of it?
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. Well, thank you for having me, Cas and Bennett. Hi, Mario. Well, to make long story short, I've been living in the U.S. for the last 15 years, almost. I got into crypto, back in 2014, in New York City, when you had the first Bitcoin ATMs, nearby Wall Street, and you had the first bar that took Bitcoin, to sell you drinks. Well, I am a Salvadoran, born and raised. So when all of this surprising news happened last June, I quickly became interested into what was happening in my country with Bitcoin. So I actually went to El Salvador, and I spent the last, let's say, from July to November, last year, to be there for the Bitcoin day, and whatnot. So, that's how it was.
Cas Piancey:
Okay. Okay. Great. Just to inform everyone, you are a senior software engineer. I didn't mention either of your jobs. I should have done that. But Mario, let us know, also, how you got into all of this. You're a developer. So obviously, you have some familiarity with the space, but also, you're born and raised El Salvador as well. Right?
Mario Gomez:
Yes. I'm Salvadorian too. Well, it's... In my case, we were monitoring all the developments of the crypto space, but more in closed technological communities, back there in El Salvador. So it was a surprise for all of us, this announcement, for the president, because no one expected them. It was something that was only of interest of these small communities. Because let's say that I have a little bit of audience in Twitter, I decided to try to explain to people what this all about, especially with Bitcoin. A lot of people started to follow me over Twitter, and then I got asked by local news, and newspapers, and also for radio and television programs, to explain to people what this was. So my idea was to explain to people in simple words, what's this technology, what where the implications for El Salvador, and why it didn't make sense, at least from principles that the Bitcoin promoters says, that are trying to promote with Bitcoin. So yeah, that's my history, back there in El Salvador. Yeah.
Cas Piancey:
Great. The reason though, that we're having both of you on today, is not just because you know more about this than we do. It's because there's been kind of a major update with the Bitcoin volcano bond, that was offered, or about to go on. I guess, about to go on sale? I'm not exactly sure how this is all working, but it has been delayed. It's been delayed until, supposedly, September. Essentially, what they've said, is that it has to do with pension reform. It has to do with Ukraine. It has to do with the price of Bitcoin, and it has to do with just about anything, but the idea that possibly... Yeah. The planet. Right. A bunch of things on the planet. The only thing it doesn't have to do with, is that this bond is possibly undersubscribed, and that people aren't interested in purchasing any of it. But I just want to hear what you guys think about this delay, and what you think is behind it, and what it could mean.
Mario Gomez:
Well, maybe I can start saying that the government is not known by delivering on time. That's something that you need to know, because it's not the first time that the government make this kind of announcements of something. There is like a long list of things that they supposedly need to deliver, all of these promises. [crosstalk 00:04:54] Yeah. So it's more... I will think that it's more or less the same here. The problem is that they usually try to rush things a little bit, the way that they rush to develop this Chivo application, and then faces a lot of problems on the release. So I will think that it could be a combination of these kind of things, let's say. I don't know what Oscar thinks about it.
Cas Piancey:
I see. You think it's just bureaucratic delays, as opposed to any kind of undersubscription, or any issues with the bond itself?
Mario Gomez:
It could be a little bit of everything, because I mean... The thing is that, I don't think that, for the Bitcoin, they are facing any kind of bureaucratic issues, because they, essentially, control everything. So they can approve a law, in the same day that they sent to the legislators. I don't think it's a bureaucratic thing. Probably it has to do with, I don't know, maybe they don't have a technical partner that is able to develop everything that they need, to develop for the bonds. Originally, I was thinking that maybe Blockstream already has everything in place, just to release. But you never know, because they change the message every day, and probably it doesn't have anything to do with any bureaucratic problems, or technological problems. Maybe that's the reason. Maybe it's not that interesting for the potential buyers.
Oscar Salguero:
I have a couple of theories. You know, at the beginning, after the bond was announced, and after I had the chance to see a few slides that were distributed by Tether... On those slides, by the way, you could see how they had at least three currencies. They had Tether Bitcoin, and the U.S. dollar. The bond will be admitted, and it will be on the liquid network, and everyone will be able to purchase it, starting at a hundred bucks. So it was a really, really low entry point. So any investor, in theory, could access it, and everything.
Oscar Salguero:
I agree with what Mario said about not being something that they couldn't do, because once the President tells the Congress, at the moment, because it's back on his favor. Right? "Approve these laws." They will approve them in no time. They even session on a Sunday, have special sessions on a Sunday, to change some laws, at his request. So if they wanted to approve these 52 laws, 52 bills, that they've been talking about, certainly they can do it. But my initial theory was that Tether wanted to actually purchase the bonds themselves, to back their stablecoin, with sovereign debt, and be able to, let's say, sell this idea of giving liquidity to governments that don't have a really good relationship with the IMF, because the IMF asks for accountability, and democracy. So, yeah. So, that was initial thought. You know, they will use El Salvador like a Petri dish, like a little experiment, to be able to go to Philippines, and other places, and offer these to other governments that need liquidity.
Oscar Salguero:
You know how in the crypto markets, you can have Tethers one day, have Bitcoin the next day, and have U.S. dollars the next day. So if Nayib needed liquidity, for paying some sovereign debt that is coming due on next year, like some 800 million in Eurobonds, so they have to pay, he will have that billion dollars to pay it, and he will still have 200 million to do whatever it is, related to Bitcoin City, or whatnot.
Oscar Salguero:
But also, you have to remember, that the Fed, in the United States, has been raising the rates. The cost of money is not the same as one year ago. There's less liquidity in the crypto market. The volumes at what Bitcoin is moving is much less. So, okay. If you launch this bond right now, there'll be less liquidity in the market, and less individual investors, or players, if you want to call them that, that will be willing to invest their cash into these kind of things. Obviously, the Ukraine and Russia situation is making the markets even more volatile. So that was my thought, at the beginning, "Oh. You know, this is just like... Tether is going to do a wash trade here." And then [crosstalk 00:09:49].
Cas Piancey:
It's a great theory, by the way. I just want to say, I think that's a fantastic theory, and I do think... It makes me think of... I don't know. I think we're probably all familiar with that image of the snake eating its own tail.
Oscar Salguero:
The ouroboros
Cas Piancey:
Yeah. So it just... It very much... Like, Tether being able to create these... Like, Blockstream and Tether creating the bond, that they then buy with the Tethers, that they then sell for the Bitcoin in the USD, that they then... You know, just this crazy weird loop that never ends. So I think you make some really compelling points there, actually. I don't want to... Sorry. I don't want to take away from Bennett. Bennett, go ahead.
Bennett Tomlin:
Well, no. I was just going to say much the same thing, as your theory, that this was Bitfinex securities, and Blockstream, working together to create the bond, and the platform, where it could be traded, so that Tether could acquire it, was always one of my pet theories. Especially since... We talked about this, back in episode 36, when we discussed this bond last time. The bond was a bad deal. You could buy existing El Salvador sovereign debt, and a set of Bitcoin, and spend less than you would on the bond.
Bennett Tomlin:
So it really kind of seemed like either they were targeting a single large investor, who had already committed, like say Tether, or that they were trying to do the other thing you mentioned, which was try to get some of the "plebes", to try to invest, so that they could fill out the rest of the bond. Right? Take advantage of people who, perhaps, didn't recognize that they were getting a worse deal than they should've. So, I guess, what I'm really curious about, and we'll go to you first with this Oscar, is... From people you've talked to, especially people in El Salvador, what's their perception of the Bitcoin bond that has been proposed?
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. Look. So the average Joe, they cannot even afford it. So, if you ask any people on the street, or friends and family, to get some liquidity, because they are in trouble, they need some money, they just know that it's another way for the government to fund themselves. But they have no hopes of participating in that, and purchasing it, because in El Salvador, the minimum wage is $364.00 a month, in the city. So if you wanted to buy even a hundred bucks of a bond, you'll be down one third of your income for the month. So, yeah. Average people will not be able to purchase it, and as you said, the regular bonds that El Salvador was issuing, they had a 19% return rate, and the Bitcoin bond was supposed to have a 6.5%.
Oscar Salguero:
There were some economists that asked some questions about the bonds. They wanted to know a little bit more information. Last week there was this guy on Twitter, his name is Frank Muchi, I think. He tweeted a long thread of 150 questions about the bond. On the other hand, if you are a plebe, or a badly informed investor, you probably wouldn't ask such questions. Right? You would probably just purchase it, because you have faith on the Bitcoin City project, or something like that. But yeah, from average the El Salvadoran perspective, this is just a way for the government [inaudible 00:13:03].
Bennett Tomlin:
Mario, is that consistent with what you've heard, or is there anything different you've been hearing?
Mario Gomez:
Yeah, I think I'm going to agree with Oscar, because when you talk with anyone in El Salvador, I don't think they are planning to invest on these bonds. Even the group of fans of the President, they are looking at these bonds like something they are going to sell to outsiders. This is the feeling that you have, when you look at their comments over social network, or in Twitter, because they say, "No. This is the government getting money from foreigners, to invest in El Salvador." It's kind of interesting, because even.... I mean, you will think that maybe, because the barrier to buy this kind of bond is not that high, there will be some people interested. But yeah, we need to understand that many people doesn't have $100.00 to spare, to spend on these kind of bonds, and wait five years just to get six. Well, to get the 6.5% on interest. So it doesn't make sense for many people.
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. I would like to add, that this bond is also... The returns of this bond is also tied to the value of Bitcoin. You know? So they were even mentioning that the bond is going to have the biggest return of investment, ROI, if Bitcoin reaches one million dollars. So that gives you an idea of how farfetched it is, that you're going to have some gains from this investment, so.
Cas Piancey:
I just want to say, to be fair, I think most bonds in America that are sold, are sold to foreign investors. Just to point out, that I think in general, the bond markets, it's not about... Like, American bonds are not for, at large anymore, the American average retail investor to purchase. At one time, that was likely the case, I think, before World War II, and during World War II, but since then, it has become far less of a investment for normal average investors. Bennett, you're going to look up, and pretend like it's a normal thing. How many bonds do you own, buddy?
Bennett Tomlin:
That's not what I'm thinking, dude. I'm thinking about the percentage of newly issued U.S. Treasuries, which end up getting bought by the Fed, and whether we might still be buying a plurality of our own bonds.
Cas Piancey:
But that's a.... That's a whole other issue that we're not going to get into in this episode, that... Let's not get everybody on the MMT, and gold bugs, and... Let's just avoid it. I don't want to go there. Let's stay on topic. You guys, obviously, have family and friends in El Salvador. So my question to you right now is, I've heard overwhelmingly that Nayib Bukele is supported by the El Salvadoran public at large. Do you think that's fair to say? Do your friends and family... Are they happy with the job that he's been doing?
Oscar Salguero:
Mario, you want to go first, or [crosstalk 00:16:19]?
Mario Gomez:
Well, it's... The problem is that this is something hard to measure, because normally the way that you measure this, is through surveys. I mean, normally, it's people calling random numbers, to try to ask people if they like, or not, the way that the President manage the country. The kind of answer you are going to get is [inaudible 00:16:52]. They kind of like the way that he works. But you need to understand, that this not the only President that has got this... I mean, a good approval, in general. It's kind of normal, that they start with higher levels of people liking them, but as time passes, and they don't deliver their promises, this perception starts to change. So at least in my family, I don't think no one like him, because what happened to me. But I think that what happens is, that this guy focus on things that he can deliver, and show everyone, even if he's not attacking the core issues of the country. So this is what gets him these high levels of approval, with the Salvadorians.
Oscar Salguero:
I would like to compliment this, mentioning that there are usually two sources of polls in El Salvador, that measure his popularity. One will be the government paid polls, from companies like [inaudible 00:18:03], and something like that. But even publish Presidential rankings, and not surprisingly, Nayib Bukele is over some of the other leaders in the world, or something like that. The other source, aside of the government sponsored polls, are the universities, like the Central American University, or the Gerardo Barrios University, and when you contrast the data, the universities always put him, maybe 10, or 15 points below the other pollsters, right. Also, you have to understand, that his popularity is based on very populous measures. For example, giving people in poor conditions a box of food, that they've been giving away since the pandemic, because a lot of people lost their jobs. There's high unemployment at the moment, in the lower-middle class, low class. So...
Oscar Salguero:
Lower middle class, low class. So look, friends and family, extended family, they are not so happy. And I even had costings that were a hundred percent for him in the past. But after all of these measures that have made the economy put down and they are not happy. They are not happy because they know that if they have a credit card, if they have a mortgage or if they have a loan for their cars, now that ranking of [El Salvador 00:19:33] banks is going down. Now that the country's Moody's rating is CCC, everything is going to become expensive. And we have a global inflation crisis too. So yeah, I bet people will be happier if the government were taking measures to protect the economy, instead of just dilapidating money in marketing and using the Bitcoin brand to push an image that when you go to El Salvador and because I go a lot to El Salvador, you don't see real change.
Oscar Salguero:
It's been the same for the last 33 years, and this government has three years and you don't see the real changes. It's just like a lot of HD videos and 4K videos and 3D renders. But that doesn't mean any change for people. So, that's what I think. And people is noticing it. People is noticing.
Mario Gomez:
They are actually pretty good in making renders.
Bennett Tomlin:
The chief [crosstalk 00:20:33] the El Salvador Bitcoin team is 3D renders.
Mario Gomez:
I don't know if you remember the oldest render that they did for the Bitcoin conference in Latin America back there in El Salvador. So, yeah, I don't want to see that again but
Bennett Tomlin:
He was in like a flying [saucer 00:20:55]. Wasn't he? Wasn't it a flying saucer?
Oscar Salguero:
Yes.
Cas Piancey:
Yeah.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. It was a flying saucer.
Oscar Salguero:
You know what guys? Bennett and Mario, if I superimpose the audio from the Bitconnect guy to that video, it matches perfectly with the UFO.
Mario Gomez:
Maybe it was done by the same guys.
Bennett Tomlin:
Both Bitconnect in El Salvador, just went on fiver and clicked the first [inaudible 00:21:20] person for 3D renders.
Cas Piancey:
Okay. Sorry to go back to a more serious topic real quick here, Mario. You mentioned that no one in your family are big fans of Nayib Bukele, because of what happened to you. Do you mind expanding on that for our listeners? Because maybe some of our listeners are not familiar with what happened.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. Okay. What happened was that everything related to the Bitcoin is keep as stop secret for the government. So a couple of days before they release this Chivo wallet, the official government Bitcoin wallet, we were able to get a couple of slides of the application and I shared that over my Twitter account because we have nothing about the application. So I tried to explain the people what was on these PowerPoint slides to explain, okay, this looks like the application and these are the features that they are going to present. And well, that was the only thing that I was doing. Next day after that I was going to my work and the police was waiting for me outside my home. So they arrested me. They took me there and they didn't allow me to talk with my lawyers.
Mario Gomez:
They never showed a warrant, and neither they explained why they were arresting me and well, fortunately I was able to notify the people on Twitter, not directly, but I have contact with the several groups of friends. So I told them, whoa, I don't know what's going on. They are taking me to the police and I don't know what's going on. So if you don't hear about me in a couple of hours, please raise your voice. So they did it. And the response was so big from all the people that they had to release me, but they took my cell phones to this day, almost six months later. I don't know where they are. And I don't know what they're doing with them or what they are planning with all this. So, and it's crazy, a lot of politicians started to tell that I was some kind of a scammer that I was...
Mario Gomez:
There was some issues with the banks a couple of day before so they were trying to accuse me of hacking the banks and things like that. So it was pretty crazy. So yeah, that's the reason why my family doesn't like Bukele administration in general. So, and they have...
Cas Piancey:
Good reason.
Mario Gomez:
Basis for [inaudible 00:24:22] good reasons.
Oscar Salguero:
I want to add that I was in El Salvador when that happened to you, Mario and I was pretty alarmed and I was part of that group of people that raised their voices on Twitter. And obviously it was an unjust arrest, as Mario said, no warrant, no reason to take his devices whatsoever. Yeah. It was really scary because it was like intimidation for everyone, everyone that was raising their voices and trying to inform the public about this big change regarding Bitcoin, because all of this information has been reserved and deemed secret. It is not the same as three years ago where you could go to the ministry of economy website and have access to a transparency section or transparency website, all of that is gone. And all of this has been deemed top secret information for the next seven years.
Oscar Salguero:
How much was invested into the Bitcoin marketing, how much was invested into the creation of Chivo wallet, which were the international partners, was there any contest to hire them or were just hired because somebody in the government pointed a finger and said, oh, I want to hire this company and this company and this company to create the backend and the ATM system and the application for Chivo wallet. So a lot of people has been speaking out and raising their voices and gathering the little bits of pieces of information to keep the people informed. And Mario was one of them and that's why he was targeted.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. And I would like to point that... I mean, I live in El Salvador my whole life and I never fear at any point that I will be target of the government just for saying the things that I saw until that day, and I think it's the worst thing because it's a complete different country that the one that I live in my whole life, because I never fear of just talking and telling the truth and speaking allow and... But is different now, the people has fear and they fear that if they start telling things about the government and they may become a target like me.
Bennett Tomlin:
There's so many bad things in those stories, right? Like this, a warrantless arrest, only released after significant pressure, trying to adopt this transparency that is advocated for on the basis of its transparency and then trying to hide it all, it's troubling.
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. And I want to mention that the governments we had in the past 30 years before this one, they were corrupt. They were bad. They left a lot of promises not accomplished, but the freedom of a speech during those 30 years was much better than the one that is going on right now. And one of the proof that I want to give you is that because we had this transparency institutions going on in El Salvador and having all of the different government branches have a transparency section on their websites, releasing documents for the public to see them and for the journalists to have access to them. We have a former president that is in jail, and we have another former president that is a fugitive, that is exile in Nicaragua. So that shows you that kind of accountability, the investigative journalism, digging on these websites, finding documents, publishing articles, having an independent district attorney, an independent judiciary system, all of that in the young democracy of El Salvador, that obviously wasn't perfect, but it was kind of starting to work.
Oscar Salguero:
And we had these two former presidents, one from the leftist FMLN party and one from the right Arena party, one jail and another fugitive. Well, now there's two fugitives from the FMLN because there is a second one that went to Nicaragua seeking asylum. So at least, institutions were kind of working and these people were in jail or were fugitives, but now this government just wiped away all of the transparency organizations, and we have no idea of how the money is being spent. El Salvadoran taxpayers money is just like the petty cash for them. We don't know how they are spending it.
Cas Piancey:
So that's another question that I actually want to address, which is, I think that... and the United States has... let's be honest, contributed its fair share to issues and problems that are present in Latin America, all over Latin America. I think that's a good way to describe what the US has done in central America and Latin America but it is interesting to me that you're suggesting that it feels far more authoritarian under Nayib because when Bennett and I did our first episode about Nayib Bukele, I think we reserved a lot of judgment. We were not trying to go there. We didn't want to declare this guy, a dictator, authoritarian. We didn't know what to expect with him, but it sounds to me like you're both firmly in the camp of... there's been a drastic change over the past few years and not for the freedom of people in our country.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. I think that's the thing because this, everything is going really fast. I mean, the first thing that they did was to change the general attorney, they replace the highest constitutional court. So the problem is that essentially they can approve any kind of laws they want. And you don't have, as a citizen, any recourse to try to defend yourself.
Mario Gomez:
Because normally, at least in the previous governments, if you feel or think that the government was unfair to you, you can go to the constitutional court and they can try to do something, right. But it's not the case anymore. So it's something that worry us a lot because I mean, it's making the work really hard for all the people that works in human rights, people that is fighting in general, for improving the situation in El Salvador, they are now targets of the government. And the way that the government targets people is one, by trying to attack their image in social networks mostly. You can see this... I don't know how to say it because you have this legion of trolls attacking people that is against the government. I think that's the best description and...
Oscar Salguero:
Yes, they have troll farms and if you criticize any cabinet member, very very soon, you're going to have someone sending the troll army after you. So yeah. Look a part of Nayib Bukele's popularity, we don't have to... we need to remember that it's because he has mastered the use of social media and that actually help him a lot to get elected. And he uses social media to incline what's hot on the news.
Cas Piancey:
We call it a cult of personality here, right so...
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah, it's a cult of personality. And what Mario was trying to convey, I guess, Mario, is that they do characters, as he mentioned-
Mario Gomez:
Yeah, that's the word.
Oscar Salguero:
That anyone that is against them... that's what they do.
Cas Piancey:
Can I just quickly... I just want to ask one question, sorry. So both of you are talking to me about this panopticon, we used that word a bunch last episode, panopticon of the government, kind of watching everything you guys are saying. And let me just express this in a different light than El Salvador, where I spent my whole life in the US, but I spent a significant portion of time before coronavirus in China. And I can tell you, I've never felt safer in my entire life than when I was in China. I wasn't going to get mugged. I wasn't going to get shot. Nothing bad was going to happen to me unless it was a government henchman putting me in prison, but never have I felt safer. I'm wondering if Nayib has made El Salvador feel safer?
Mario Gomez:
I don't think so.
Oscar Salguero:
Not at all. No, because what you see on the images you see on the media, the soldiers going around, they are not really accomplishing their mission. First of all, we have the police, the national civil police, those guys have the mission to keep everyone safe. The army is not supposed to be on the streets doing this kind of civilian security tasks, but no, it's not safe guys. Look, you can go to El Salvador to the touristy places, you can go to middle class neighborhoods, expensive neighborhoods too and you won't get mugged but if you are the other person that takes public transportation and lives in a trouble neighborhood that is dominated by one of the gangs, you are in risk and you cannot walk... if you live in one neighborhood, you cannot walk into the next neighborhood because what's going to happen is that the gang members, they will ask for your ID to verify your address and if you don't live there, at least two things will happen.
Oscar Salguero:
One, is that they going to ask you for money, extort you to let you go. And the other one is that you probably won't get out of that neighborhood alive anymore so it's that unsafe in some bad neighborhoods, but maybe 90% of the country is safe. If you travel there, go to the beaches and Bitcoin beach and what not, it'll be safe for you. And also as El Salvadoran, I have common sense and I have a street smart and I know where to go and where not to go so that also helps. But I wanted to come back to the Bitcoin topic and the crypto topic, because it's really ironic, right. That Bitcoin was supposed to be a tool for individuals' financial freedom. And now it's being used by a government that is increasingly authoritarian, right. And you see the Bitcoin community, they are libertarian, they are all kinds of people, but they don't seem to be bothered.
Cas Piancey:
They prefer [volunteers 00:35:48] now, which is the ultimate hypocrisy with what you're talking about but...
Oscar Salguero:
But they don't seem to be bothered about who is using and pushing Bitcoin, as long as the number goes up. So, yeah, it's really sad and ironic that this kind of technology, instead of being used for what it was initially intended, it has evolved into a tool for a horrible dystopia so...
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. And I would like to add that most of the perception of the improvement in the security situation in El Salvador is because the number of or the homicide rate is reduced. But the problem that that's a tricky measure of security. First, because extortions to business is something that it still happens and happens a lot. You cannot have a small business there because you know that at some point, some gang members are going to ask you for money, if you want to continue operating. And the other thing that is usually not reporting is missing people. And we have a lot of missing people in El Salvador. And these two numbers are... You are not going to hear about this because obviously the government doesn't want to looks like it's failing.
Mario Gomez:
And the only number that they can control, I think that there was a [VICE 00:37:19] episode a couple of months ago, where some gang members explained that they can control the numbers of... they can and reduce the number of homicides, just to show that they have the control of this number. So that's the real situation and it's crazy because people see that there is less homicide rate, but yeah, in reality, nothing has changed. And many of us suspect that there is some kind of truth between the gangs and the government.
Bennett Tomlin:
During that you mentioned government failure so I think now would be a great time to discuss Bitcoin day when
PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [00:38:04]
Bennett Tomlin:
I think now would be a great time to discuss Bitcoin day when Bitcoin officially became legal tender in El Salvador. So Oscar, can you describe briefly your experiences and the things you saw on Bitcoin day?
Oscar Salguero:
Look, Bennett. I am a mobile developer. I've been creating apps for the last 10 years, so I was really eager in September last year to download Chivo Wallet into my devices and start using it. So that's what I did, but unfortunately during the first three or four hours, apparently they didn't make the system elastic, they didn't have the server capacity to handle the demand, so it crashed. So it was really funny because after they launched it, you had the president on Twitter trying to be like customer support for the app and telling people, "We are having a disruption at the moment. Please try again later. If you're having issues with the app, uninstall it, install it again," and whatnot.
Oscar Salguero:
So the initial experience of all of the El Salvadorans with Chivo Wallet was that they couldn't download it, and the second bit of the experience was that the KYC was failing and the KYC consisted on you taking a picture of your national ID that is called the [duey 00:39:26], the front and the back, and also taking a selfie of yourself. People was playing with the app and taking a picture of a cup or a picture of a plant and the thing was working. So apparently the KYC was not fine tuned. So they had these technical issues. As a developer, as a software engineer, I can tell you that those issues have been resolved. Now the app kind of works. It took for them one week to fix that, but then after that more issues came afloat, among them you trying to send a transaction between the lining network and the transaction getting stuck for days. You saw your money was kind of frozen there.
Oscar Salguero:
Other phenomena that happened is that criminals started impersonating people. In El Salvador, there have never been data protection laws and the database, the national data of national ID's, it's something that is rolling around. There is a black market for that kind of information that it sold and purchased. So yeah, some criminals that were tech savvy or something, they got ahold of this database of national IDs that include your DOB. Date of birth, picture, first name, last name, the city you live, and those were the data points that you had to enter on Chivo Wallet in order to sign in, create an account and get your $30 gift.
Oscar Salguero:
What happened is that this $30 gift was sent from one wallet to another, and as soon as the ATMs were up, some people went to the ATM and cashed out the $30. That was the initial experience with Chivo Wallet and thousands of Salvadorans were impersonated and their identities were used to create an account, among them family and friends of mine that are supposed to be tech savvy. But yeah, it was a random thing and I didn't wanted to download the app at the beginning, but then my curiosity as a developer dominated me and I actually got it. To date, I made more than 200 transactions on Chivo Wallet. I've done all kinds of transactions. As an immigrant, I've also tried to use it to send remittances so I can tell you how that goes too, but I want to give the word to Mario. So maybe Mario can compliment some stuff.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. I think that the thing with the Chivo Wallet is many people download it because they were gifting this 30 USD in Bitcoin equivalent on the application. It was kind of funny because since the first day there was some kind of black market for this $30, because you can find in Facebook posts people paying you $15 or $20 so they can cash your $30. Because at the end of the day, for some people, it was really difficult to actually download the app and follow the process. So there was people paying less than the real price, just to get this money out of the ATMs. The ATMs didn't work that well either. To this day, there is a lot of ATMs that are not working anymore, but apparently this has to do with the company that provided them.
Mario Gomez:
Apparently Athena has had a lot of issues internally when they were providing these ATM machines. So for what I heard, I don't know if it's a situation, but apparently they are unable to update the software on the ATMs and this is the reason why some of them are not working anymore. Fast forward six months, I think that the best measure of the use of the application is the numbers that the government has shared about the number of remittances that they report in cryptocurrency. I suppose that they get this number from the Chivo Wallet, because I don't think any other way that they can actually trace the money flowing into El Salvador. I mean, the amount that they're transferring is getting smaller month to month. So yeah, it doesn't look like the principal use case to send remittances is actually working. It's just a small percentage from the total,.I think is less than 1% of the total remittances sent to El Salvador.
Mario Gomez:
When you look at the numbers, there is an association of business back there in El Salvador. They did a poll at the beginning of this year and they ask business owner if they were using Bitcoin and 90% say that they didn't use it at all. The remaining 10%, 4% say that it helped to actually increase their sales, but around 5% also say that it actually reduced their sale, I suppose, because they had maybe some problem with the platform or with the volatility. So yeah, I mean, Chivo Wallet works sort of for the people that uses it, but at the end of the day, it is being used by people that mostly want to speculate. The use case that was sold to the population, I don't think it's actually working for most of the people.
Oscar Salguero:
Yes. I agree. Day to day transactions are not working, but some people is probably day trading with the app and that's basically the use space that has probably the daily active users of Chivo Wallet. Look, as an immigrant in the United States with family in El Salvador, I've been sending remittances to help my people pay some stuff, pay off my own debts and whatnot, for the last decade, maybe more. I've used all of the tools available to Salvadorans that you can imagine. In the first couple of months that I was in the states, I didn't have a social security number because I had a G4 visa, a diplomat visa, and the way that I sent money is basically going to a Western Union in a little bodega in Washington DC. That's how I send money to my family members [inaudible 00:46:31].
Oscar Salguero:
After that, when I got my SSN, I was able to open a bank account and have a driver's license and also get this Zoom application to send money to El Salvador. There's nothing more practical than Zoom. For example, if you want to send 1000 bucks, 1000 U.S. Dollars, it's going to charge you 14.99 or 13.99 as commission.
Cas Piancey:
Is this the PayPal subsidiary thing?
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. Yeah. It's a PayPal subsidiary. The money is almost instantly in your bank account in El Salvador, so basically mirrors an ACH transaction within the U.S., but it does it internationally. But now I want to say this. I am an exception out of the 2.5 million Salvadorians that will live in the United States because my immigration status is not irregular. But if you think about most of my fellow Salvadorians, they do not have a social security number, they do not have driver's license, and what happens; if you really want to use Bitcoin to send remittance as to El Salvador and help these people that sends another rush of 200, 300 bucks a month to Salvador and you don't want the Zooms or the Western Unions of the world taking five or $10 out of it, which I think the commission never goes over 5%. Sometimes it's 2%. But what happens?
Oscar Salguero:
You cannot open a Coinbase account if you don't have an SSN, if you don't have a national ID from the United States, or a driver license. So there's a barrier for the immediate grants in the United States to acquire this kind of way of purchasing Bitcoin, even if they want to download Strike, which was the application that was publicized at the beginning, they have to go through a KYC process and provide an ID. So in practice, only people that has immigration status as H1B visa, which is work permit, maybe some diplomats, maybe some residents like myself, we will be able to legally create an account on a crypto exchange by Bitcoin or maybe on Strike and then send it to my family or friend in El Salvador using Chivo Wallet. But it's not practical. The great majority of Salvadorans that send remittances, they wouldn't be able to use it.
Mario Gomez:
I just want to point that even with the Chivo Wallet, you need that credit or debit card to purchase Bitcoin, even if they are not asking for a social security number or any valid identification in the U.S. So you don't have a way to evade the fact that you need to do a transaction with the traditional banks and the traditional payment systems. The only way that the people can send actual money using Chivo Wallet was going to these consulates of El Salvador around the U.S. and use one of the Chivo ATMs over there. So you can go with your cash, put it into the machine and send it to the people back there in El Salvador. But it doesn't make sense because no one is going to spend half of their day just going to the consulate to use an ATM to send money back to El Salvador. So the use case at the end of the day, and after six months, doesn't make a lot of sense.
Bennett Tomlin:
Yeah. It certainly doesn't seem like it's clearly beating Western Union here. So the other part of what the Chivo Wallet was supposed to be and what this whole Bitcoin legal tender bill was supposed to accomplish is that merchants were supposed to, were obligated to, accept Bitcoin as soon as they had the technical capacity. Mario, you already shared that stat from this group of businesses in El Salvador that suggests the vast majority of them haven't accepted Bitcoin. Is this because a majority of businesses still aren't accepting Bitcoin, or there's just no one who wants to pay using Bitcoin?
Mario Gomez:
That's a very good question. Well, the thing is normally what you can do in El Salvador is just say, "Well, I don't have a way to receive Bitcoin payments," and supposedly that frees you from the obligation of receive even Bitcoin payments and that could work, but the problem is that we have this consumer protection office, and the problem is that anyone can report your business. If you go there and you are not receiving Bitcoin payments, they can go to the consumer protection office and fill a report to say, "Mario is not accepting Bitcoin." So they can go to your business, make an inspection, and if you don't comply or you don't have any means to accept Bitcoin, they can find you. So that's the thing with the business. Obviously, if not very much people is using a Bitcoin to pay, you are not going to see many reports of people being fined for not accepting Bitcoin, but it's something that could happen.
Mario Gomez:
We got a report of a small store where this protection office came just to verify if they were accepting Bitcoin there. So yeah, that's the thing with the business. Most people, what he's doing is essentially just downloading the application or it's kind of fun because sometimes they download ... we heard reports of people loading the Chivo application for their business because they know that sometimes it doesn't work. So if the official application from the government is not working, well, that's a very good excuse to not accept Bitcoin. So it's kind of crazy.
Oscar Salguero:
Actually, I want to add that last time that I was there in January, I went to several places and tried to pay with Chivo Wallet or [MonWallet 00:53:07] and I saw that people is really creative and they actually research and a couple of places, they are using open node for a third party provider that they came up with to comply with the law. There was another place that is like a Subway-like franchise, but it's not Subway, that had a little sign next to the register saying that they were working in between ports in a solution and that the IT company that was the provider was delayed and that was the reason they were not accepting Bitcoin. But yeah, the Chivo Wallet has basically three modes. You can be an individual, you can be a company or you can be a point of sale.
Oscar Salguero:
Most of the time, the point of sale transaction fails. They give you your sandwich, they give you your pupusa or something, and you have to wait some time for the transaction to show up. What happened to a lot of merchants was that they provided the product or services, the consumer used it or ate the sandwich or something and they were still waiting for the payments. Some of the other guys, there was a guy that made some business which [inaudible 00:54:26] at the beginning and had $300 worth of money over there. When he connected his checking or savings or account from the Salvadoran bank and he wanted to transfer the money from the Chivo Wallet to the bank, which in El Salvador we have ACH transactions for decades. It's something that we have. It didn't work and the $300 got stuck in the system and he had to call the customers support line to get it unstuck.
Oscar Salguero:
Myself, one of the latest tests that I did a few months ago is that I sent $1,000 to a MonWallet address and it took 19 days for that transaction to pan out and I had to call customer support three times. Yeah. If we go back to the component where you don't want to be under this panopticon of government control ... this is the funniest thing. One Thursday I sent a transaction of $19 from my Chivo Wallet to a MonWallet address. It didn't went through and on Friday, 24 hours later, I got a call on my Salvadoran cell phone, where I have Chivo Wallet installed, from the Chivo Wallet customer support, apologizing because of the transaction didn't went through and that the balance of the money I sent should be on my account.
Oscar Salguero:
So if I download MonWallet in whatever in the world, and I have my Bitcoin there, there's no government that is tracking me and there's no one knowing how much money I am transacting there. But with Chivo Wallet, it's just so controlled by the government that there's no privacy at all. You were saying this, Cas, on the last podcast that you like cash because it's private and you can spend it as you want, and nobody's going to be tracking you. Well, Chivo Wallet doesn't work as cash, even though it has a balance in Bitcoin and a balance in USD.
Cas Piancey:
I just want to say how blown away I am by the idea of a 19 day wait time on a $1000 transfer, especially to a place like El Salvador where that's life or death money, I would assume, sometimes.
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. It's like three months worth of wages.
Cas Piancey:
Exactly. That's not $1,000 in Los Angeles, California or whatever. It is real, serious money. The idea of that getting hung up for three weeks, it's blowing my mind. I can send money to China right now and it will take-
PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [00:57:04]
Cas Piancey:
It's blowing my mind. I can send money to China right now and it will take two days. America hates China. It's easy for me to send money there. This is utterly insane to me. It's utterly insane.
Bennett Tomlin:
Yeah. So I guess one of the last things I'm really curious about is what Salvadorians think about Bitcoin beach.
Mario Gomez:
It's kind of crazy, everything related to Bitcoin Beach. First, the actual name of the place is El Zonte. And they renamed it, not official, but because the place, it still has its name, to Bitcoin Beach because they started with this during the pandemic when people in the middle of the lockdowns, they received this donation of Bitcoin. If I'm not wrong, it was around nine Bitcoins that they received. And then used this to pay people locally to do all kinds of purchases. For most of the people, I think it was just curiosity that they can visit. One of the things that people live within the cities in El Salvador is normally you go over the weekend to the beach because it's pretty close or during the week. So most of the people just went there because they want to go to a [inaudible 00:58:36] ATM back there via a Bitcoin. And then spend it on the couple of small business around.
Mario Gomez:
And that was, "Oh." But you know, the people behind the people behind the Bitcoin Beach project, they are going to tell you that it's a fully Bitcoinized something like that community. And everyone uses it to pay everything. But when you go there, you see that it's not the case. First, all the prices are in dollars. So obviously they are interested in change and exchange their Bitcoin to dollars, because at the end of the day, they need someone at some point to buy anything outside that community. So they need to exchange it to dollars.
Mario Gomez:
And second, we had the opportunity need to go there and talk with the people that were not using Bitcoin. And the reasons they gave us was that they couldn't cope with the volatility of Bitcoin because they live day to day. So one of the problems they had was that they could receive pay payments, but then they need the money for the next day. And sometimes the ATM didn't have cash. Or they have to wait. Or they need to transfer the Bitcoin to another person to give them dollars.
Cas Piancey:
And maybe it takes 19 fucking days to get your US dollars, right?
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. It was crazy because one of the girls we were talking back there told us that for some reason, the ATM didn't work after 5:00 or 6:00 PM. So if you end your day after 5:00 or 6:00, you'll find the ATM closed. So you probably won't be able to get the money to buy the things you need for the next day. What they told us was that the ones that were actually using Bitcoin were the big business. The hotel owners, the restaurant owners that have a lot of more liquidity. And obviously they sold that as an investment because they can buy 500, $1,000 in Bitcoin and they can wait...
Cas Piancey:
Huddling. They're just huddling.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. So the reality was completely different of what is being sold. And everything around Bitcoin in El Salvador, there is lack of any transparency. I have asked Peterson so many times to tell us what they're doing with the Bitcoin. If they have like some balance sheet so we take a look of how the money flow, if they have any measure to say that the implementation of Bitcoin was a success. And they say they cannot share anything of that because they don't work for us. And why we want to know about that.
Mario Gomez:
And you'll think it's basic. If you are running a nonprofit organization, you should have a way to report what you are doing with the money that people is donating to you. And these people cannot give you the most simple numbers to really evaluate if the Bitcoin Beach is really a success. Or for me, I don't know. It looks like there is something missing there. It looks fine when you are far away from the actual beach, but as you get there and talk with the people, it's not like the picture.
Bennett Tomlin:
And it sounds like the businesses you say are accepting and potentially keeping some of the Bitcoin, spending the Bitcoin and trying to use it. It sounds to me like the types of businesses you're describing are the ones that would potentially appeal the most to Bitcoin-rich foreign tourists who are interested in this beach where people accept Bitcoin.
Oscar Salguero:
Hotels, restaurants in the area. Yeah. And look, I want to mention something. If the great maxim of Bitcoiners is verified on trust, in El Salvador that's impossible. Because this Bitcoin Beach project is not open with their system. There's no place for us to go and get a hold on this balance sheet that Mario mentioned, to see if this NGO is working transparently in the same way Chivo Wallet doesn't give you the hash so you can go to any blockchain explorer and see the transactions. And we cannot even know where are the Bitcoins that the country purchased. So there's so much obscurity around all of this topic, that if you are really like a good Bitcoiner and you want to verify and not trust, that's going to be impossible for you at any level.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. And I think this is the core issue of everything, the lack of transparency. There is no way that you can verify what is going on. I think that several newspaper try to get the information about this trust fund that supposedly is used to be able to convert between Bitcoin and dollars. And what the government say to the reporters was that this information is secret because there is bank secrecy, which is a lie. Because there is no law that says that you can hide the use of public funds. But they say that is a secret.
Mario Gomez:
And the other thing is all the companies involved on this. Chivo Wallet is the official government wallet, but at the same time is managed by a private company that was funded with public money. So we don't have a way to get information because there is some precedent that we can ask private companies about the use of funds, if those are public funds. But the problem is that we don't have any way to ask them to give us a report, to give us information about their funds or how they spend everything.
Cas Piancey:
Just so people understand what I think you're referring to right now is that people like Bennett and I in the US have what's called a FOIA request so we can go ahead and request specific information from the government based on our rights as citizens of that government. You're saying that does not exist in El Salvador.
Mario Gomez:
Exists in law, in practice, regarding to everything related to Bitcoin is just impossible at this time.
Cas Piancey:
Okay.
Oscar Salguero:
And this is because we had this institution that was called the IAIP and that was one of the institutions keeping an eye on all of this transparency aspect of governance. But that's another institution that has been dismantled in the last couple of years. So yeah, there's no way to do a FOIA request in El Salvador. But I think also, we forgot to mention that the US Congress had a couple of weeks ago requested for a bill to investigate the Bitcoin implementation in El Salvador. And that request was approved. So there's going to be a natural US Congress investigation regarding this matter.
Oscar Salguero:
So all of the information that has been kept secret from El Salvador and people and the world might pop up in the future due to this investigation. And El Salvador is not an island, it's not isolated. You have to comply with FATCA, you have to comply with FinCEN. It's on the Swift banking system. [US Salvadoran 01:07:05], that's moving more than $5,000, you have to fill a form. And if you are a US resident, you have to comply with FATCA stuff too. So El Salvador is not like a lawless place in the great world stage. Or is not exempt from this international agreements or so.
Cas Piancey:
It's not North Korea is what you're saying.
Oscar Salguero:
Yeah. Not yet, anyway.
Cas Piancey:
Let's hope not ever. But what I do want to say right now quickly, sorry guys, is that, Oscar, I want to leave this with you. And then Mario, you jump in right after that. What is most important for everyone who's listening right now to know? And if you guys are willing, we'd love to have you on again at anytime. I think we need to get regular updates about El Salvador. We need to get regular updates about what's going on in Latin America with all of this stuff. I think it's very, very important.
Cas Piancey:
But Oscar, let's start with you. What do you want our listeners to know as they leave this episode?
Oscar Salguero:
Sure. Look, I would like you to know that the Bitcoin implementation in El Salvador was a surprise for a 100% of El Salvador until June 2021. This isn't something that was like a campaign promised by the people that is implementing it. It was never mentioned until June 2021. There was no public consensus. There was no study with different parts of society. Like in the same way that the federal reserve is studying the possibility of a CBCD in the United States.
Oscar Salguero:
So Salvadorians didn't ask for this. They didn't vote for this. And it seems to be that it is not fair to go and change the lives of millions of people and play with their economy, just because you want the Bitcoin number go up. So if you are a Bitcoiner please try to talk with a Salvadorian and ask what they think, not just look at the government outlets.
Oscar Salguero:
And there's a lot of them, it's like a propaganda machine. You have to see through that. And try to get well informed and think about, there's millions of people that have been obligated to use this tool, in this case Bitcoin. So that will be the most important thing that I think at the moment, you should know. I will continue doing my job and trying to make out where people in El Salvador and Latin America, in Spanish, telling them about all of the scams and bad stuff that is happening with crypto, NFTs and whatnot.
Oscar Salguero:
And thank you so much Cas and Bennett for having me. And if you want me to come back, I'll come back. That'll be my pleasure. Thanks so much.
Mario Gomez:
Yeah. Maybe what I will like to say is that we, as Salvadorians, don't have a way to really know what the use of public funds in the case of Bitcoin. It's something that was not consulted with anyone in the country. It's something that apparently came from Bukele's family. Because it's not only Nayib, it's also his brothers. And the problem is that this is taxes, it's money from the taxes of Salvadorians that is being used to place a bet on Bitcoin.
Mario Gomez:
And I think that's not fair. I don't think that anyone in any country, in particular in the US will accept that a politician takes taxpayer money to place a bet on something like Bitcoin. And I think that's an important thing that I will point regarding all of this. And we don't have any way to verify the use of public funds in El Salvador at this time.
Cas Piancey:
I think you both make really compelling points. And as Americans, I can only say that the stuff you're expressing to us, for me, it hits really close to home in terms of like, "If this was happening here on a large scale, like you're talking about, I think not only would I be concerned and Bennett would be concerned, but Americans at large would be really concerned about the stuff that you're talking about." So I think you're making very important and compelling points. And God, we would love to have you guys on again. I look forward to talking about all of this soon. It's constantly shifting. The narrative is moving. The stories are changing. And who knows what next month or next year is going to bring. So I look forward to another discussion. This has been super enlightening. So thank you both very, very much.
Bennett Tomlin:
Yes. Thank you. This was fantastic to talk to both of you and get this more full picture of what the reality of this project looks like.
Cas Piancey:
No desperate pleads today. I'm proud of that episode. I am so grateful that Mario and Oscar decided to join us on the podcast. It's more important that people hear about what's going on in El Salvador. So please share this with someone you know, if they're a maxi or if they are concerned about geopolitics. Thank you for listening.

Spanish Transcript:

Cas Piancey:
Bienvenidos de nuevo a todos. Soy Cas Piancey, y me acompaña, como siempre, mi compañero de fatigas, el Sr. Bennett Tomlin. ¿Cómo están hoy?
Bennett Tomlin:
Cansado, pero bastante bien. ¿Cómo estás, Cas?
Cas Piancey:
Ah. Estoy bien, así que eso es bueno. Pero hoy nos acompañan dos invitados muy especiales, Oscar Salguero y Mario Gómez, ambos mucho más enterados de lo que pasa en El Salvador, que Bennett y yo, que han tratado de hacerse una idea de cómo se ha comportado Nayib, y lo que ha significado esta moneda legal Bitcoin para el país de El Salvador, en Centroamérica. Pero bienvenidos los dos. Es un placer tenerlos aquí. Oscar, empecemos por ti. ¿Cómo te metiste en todo esto? ¿Cómo te metiste en El Salvador, en esto del Bitcoin, en todo esto?
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Bueno, gracias por recibirme, Cas y Bennett. Hola, Mario. Bueno, para hacer la historia corta, he estado viviendo en los Estados Unidos durante los últimos 15 años, casi. Me metí en el cripto, allá por el 2014, en la ciudad de Nueva York, cuando tenías los primeros cajeros de Bitcoin, cerca de Wall Street, y tenías el primer bar que aceptaba Bitcoin, para venderte bebidas. Bueno, yo soy salvadoreño, nacido y criado. Así que cuando todas estas sorprendentes noticias ocurrieron el pasado mes de junio, rápidamente me interesé por lo que estaba ocurriendo en mi país con Bitcoin. Así que en realidad fui a El Salvador, y pasé el último, digamos, de julio a noviembre, el año pasado, para estar allí para el día de Bitcoin, y lo que no. Así que, así fue.
Cas Piancey:
De acuerdo. Bien. Muy bien. Sólo para informar a todos, eres un ingeniero de software senior. No mencioné ninguno de sus trabajos. Debería haberlo hecho. Pero Mario, dinos también cómo te metiste en todo esto. Eres un desarrollador. Así que, obviamente, tienes cierta familiaridad con el espacio, pero también, has nacido y crecido en El Salvador. ¿No es así?
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Yo también soy salvadoreño. Bueno, es... En mi caso, estábamos siguiendo todos los desarrollos del espacio criptográfico, pero más en comunidades tecnológicas cerradas, allá en El Salvador. Así que fue una sorpresa para todos nosotros, este anuncio, para el presidente, porque nadie los esperaba. Era algo que sólo interesaba a estas pequeñas comunidades. Como digamos que tengo un poco de audiencia en Twitter, decidí tratar de explicar a la gente de qué se trata todo esto, especialmente con el Bitcoin. Mucha gente empezó a seguirme en Twitter, y luego me pidieron en las noticias locales, y en los periódicos, y también en los programas de radio y televisión, que explicara a la gente qué era esto. Así que mi idea era explicar a la gente en palabras sencillas, qué es esta tecnología, cuáles eran las implicaciones para El Salvador, y por qué no tenía sentido, al menos desde los principios que dicen los promotores de Bitcoin, que están tratando de promover con Bitcoin. Así que sí, esa es mi historia, allá en El Salvador. Sí.
Cas Piancey:
Muy bien. La razón, sin embargo, que estamos teniendo los dos en el día de hoy, no es sólo porque usted sabe más sobre esto que nosotros. Es porque ha habido una especie de actualización importante con el bono volcán Bitcoin, que se ofreció [crosstalk 00:03:44], o a punto de salir. Supongo, ¿a punto de salir a la venta? No estoy exactamente seguro de cómo funciona todo esto, pero se ha retrasado. Se ha retrasado hasta, supuestamente, septiembre. Esencialmente, lo que han dicho, es que tiene que ver con la reforma de las pensiones. Tiene que ver con Ucrania. Tiene que ver con el precio de Bitcoin, y tiene que ver con casi todo, pero la idea [crosstalk 00:04:09] que posiblemente... Sí. El planeta. Correcto. Un montón de cosas en el planeta. La única cosa que no tiene que ver con, es que este bono es posiblemente sub-suscrito, y que la gente no está interesada en la compra de cualquiera de ellos. Pero sólo quiero escuchar lo que ustedes piensan sobre este retraso, y lo que creen que está detrás de él, y lo que podría significar.
Mario Gómez:
Bueno, tal vez pueda empezar a decir que el gobierno no se caracteriza por cumplir con los plazos. Eso es algo que hay que saber, porque no es la primera vez que el gobierno hace este tipo de anuncios de algo. Hay como una larga lista de cosas que supuestamente tienen que cumplir, todas estas promesas. [crosstalk 00:04:54] Sí. Así que es más... Voy a pensar que es más o menos lo mismo aquí. El problema es que por lo general tratan de apresurar las cosas un poco, la forma en que se apresuran a desarrollar esta aplicación Chivo, y luego se enfrenta a un montón de problemas en el lanzamiento. Así que voy a pensar que podría ser una combinación de este tipo de cosas, digamos. No sé lo que Oscar piensa al respecto.
Cas Piancey:
Ya veo. ¿Cree que son sólo retrasos burocráticos, en lugar de cualquier tipo de suscripción insuficiente, o cualquier problema con el bono en sí?
Mario Gómez:
Podría ser un poco de todo, porque quiero decir... La cosa es que, no creo que, para el Bitcoin, se enfrentan a cualquier tipo de problemas burocráticos, porque ellos, esencialmente, controlar todo. Así que pueden aprobar una ley, en el mismo día que enviaron a los legisladores. No creo que sea una cosa burocrática. Probablemente tiene que ver con, no sé, tal vez no tienen un socio técnico que es capaz de desarrollar todo lo que necesitan, para desarrollar para los bonos. Originalmente, estaba pensando que tal vez Blockstream ya tiene todo en su lugar, sólo para liberar. Pero nunca se sabe, porque cambian el mensaje todos los días, y probablemente no tiene nada que ver con ningún problema burocrático, o problemas tecnológicos. Tal vez esa sea la razón. Tal vez no es tan interesante para los compradores potenciales.
Oscar Salguero:
Tengo un par de teorías. Usted sabe, al principio, después de que el bono fue anunciado, y después de que tuve la oportunidad de ver algunas diapositivas que fueron distribuidos por Tether ... En esas diapositivas, por cierto, se podía ver cómo tenían al menos tres monedas. Tenían Tether Bitcoin, y el dólar estadounidense. El bono será admitido, y estará en la red líquida, y todo el mundo podrá comprarlo, a partir de cien dólares. Así que era un punto de entrada muy, muy bajo. Así que cualquier inversor, en teoría, podría acceder a él, y todo.
Oscar Salguero:
Estoy de acuerdo con lo que ha dicho Mario de que no es algo que no puedan hacer, porque una vez que el Presidente se lo dice al Congreso, de momento, pues vuelve a estar a su favor. ¿No es así? "Aprueba estas leyes". Las aprobarán en un santiamén. Incluso sesionan en domingo, tienen sesiones especiales en domingo, para cambiar algunas leyes, a petición de él. Así que si quisieran aprobar estas 52 leyes, 52 proyectos de ley, de las que han estado hablando, ciertamente pueden hacerlo. Pero mi teoría inicial era que Tether quería realmente comprar los bonos ellos mismos, para respaldar su stablecoin, con la deuda soberana, y ser capaz de, digamos, vender esta idea de dar liquidez a los gobiernos que no tienen una muy buena relación con el FMI, porque el FMI pide la rendición de cuentas, y la democracia. Así que, sí. Así que, ese fue el pensamiento inicial. Ya sabes, usarán El Salvador como una placa de Petri, como un pequeño experimento, para poder ir a Filipinas, y otros lugares, y ofrecer esto a otros gobiernos que necesitan liquidez.
Oscar Salguero:
Ya sabes que en los mercados de criptomonedas, puedes tener Tethers un día, tener Bitcoin al día siguiente, y tener dólares americanos al día siguiente. Así que si Nayib necesitaba liquidez, para pagar alguna deuda soberana que vence el próximo año, como unos 800 millones en eurobonos, por lo que tienen que pagar, tendrá esos mil millones de dólares para pagarlos, y todavía tendrá 200 millones para hacer lo que sea, relacionado con Bitcoin City, o lo que sea.
Oscar Salguero:
Pero también hay que recordar que la Fed, en Estados Unidos, ha estado subiendo los tipos. El costo del dinero no es el mismo que hace un año. Hay menos liquidez en el mercado de criptomonedas. Los volúmenes a los que se mueve el Bitcoin son mucho menores. Así que, de acuerdo. Si lanzas este bono ahora mismo, habrá menos liquidez en el mercado, y menos inversores individuales, o jugadores, si quieres llamarlos así, que estarán dispuestos a invertir su dinero en este tipo de cosas. Obviamente, la situación de Ucrania y Rusia está haciendo que los mercados sean aún más volátiles. Así que ese fue mi pensamiento, al principio, "Oh. Usted sabe, esto es como ... Tether va a hacer una operación de lavado aquí." Y luego [crosstalk 00:09:49].
Cas Piancey:
Es una gran teoría, por cierto. Sólo quiero decir que creo que es una teoría fantástica, y creo... Me hace pensar en... No sé. Creo que probablemente todos estamos familiarizados con esa imagen de la serpiente comiéndose su propia cola.
Oscar Salguero:
El ouroboros [crosstalk 00:10:02]
Cas Piancey:
Sí. Así que sólo... Es muy... Como, Tether ser capaz de crear estos ... Como, Blockstream y Tether creando el bono, que luego compran con los Tethers, que luego venden por el Bitcoin en el USD, que luego... Ya sabes, sólo este loco y extraño bucle que nunca termina. Así que creo que haces algunos puntos realmente convincentes allí, en realidad. No quiero... Lo siento. No quiero quitarle protagonismo a Bennett. Bennett, adelante.
Bennett Tomlin:
Bueno, no. Iba a decir más o menos lo mismo, ya que tu teoría, de que se trataba de valores de Bitfinex, y Blockstream, trabajando juntos para crear el bono, y la plataforma, donde se pudiera negociar, para que Tether pudiera adquirirlo, siempre fue una de mis teorías favoritas. Especialmente desde... Hablamos de esto, en el episodio 36, cuando discutimos este bono la última vez. El bono era un mal negocio. Usted podría comprar la deuda soberana existente de El Salvador, y un conjunto de Bitcoin, y gastar menos de lo que lo haría en el bono.
Bennett Tomlin:
Así que realmente parecía como si estuvieran apuntando a un solo gran inversor, que ya se había comprometido, como decir Tether, o que estaban tratando de hacer la otra cosa que usted mencionó, que era tratar de conseguir algunos de los "plebeyos", para tratar de invertir, para que pudieran llenar el resto del bono. ¿No es así? Aprovecharse de la gente que, tal vez, no reconoció que estaban recibiendo un trato peor de lo que deberían. Así que, supongo, lo que realmente tengo curiosidad, y vamos a ir a usted primero con este Oscar, es ... De la gente con la que has hablado, especialmente la gente de El Salvador, ¿cuál es su percepción del bono Bitcoin que se ha propuesto?
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Mira. Así que el ciudadano medio, ni siquiera puede permitírselo. Entonces, si tú le pides a cualquier gente en la calle, o a amigos y familiares, que consigan algo de liquidez, porque están en problemas, necesitan algo de dinero, simplemente saben que es otra forma de financiarse del gobierno. Pero no tienen esperanzas de participar en eso, y comprarlo, porque en El Salvador, el salario mínimo es de 364 dólares al mes, en la ciudad. Así que si quisieras comprar incluso cien dólares de un bono, estarías perdiendo un tercio de tus ingresos del mes. Así que, sí. La gente promedio no podrá comprarlo, y como dijiste, los bonos regulares que El Salvador estaba emitiendo, tenían una tasa de retorno del 19%, y el bono Bitcoin se suponía que tenía un 6,5%.
Oscar Salguero:
Hubo algunos economistas que hicieron algunas preguntas sobre los bonos. Querían saber un poco más de información. La semana pasada hubo un tipo en Twitter, su nombre es Frank Muchi, creo. Tuiteó un largo hilo de 150 preguntas sobre el bono. Por otro lado, si eres un plebeyo, o un inversor mal informado, probablemente no harías esas preguntas. ¿No es así? Probablemente lo comprarías sin más, porque tienes fe en el proyecto de la Ciudad Bitcoin, o algo así. Pero sí, desde la perspectiva media de El Salvador, esto es sólo una manera para que el gobierno [inaudible 00:13:03].
Bennett Tomlin:
Mario, ¿es eso coherente con lo que has oído, o hay algo diferente que hayas escuchado?
Mario Gómez:
Sí, creo que voy a estar de acuerdo con Oscar, porque cuando hablas con cualquier persona en El Salvador, no creo que estén pensando en invertir en estos bonos. Incluso el grupo de seguidores del Presidente, están viendo estos bonos como algo que van a vender a los de afuera. Esta es la sensación que tienes, cuando ves sus comentarios en las redes sociales, o en Twitter, porque dicen: "No. Esto es el gobierno recibiendo dinero de los extranjeros, para invertir en El Salvador". Es algo interesante, porque incluso.... Quiero decir, pensarás que tal vez, porque la barrera para comprar este tipo de bonos no es tan alta, habrá algunas personas interesadas. Pero sí, tenemos que entender que mucha gente no tiene 100 dólares de sobra, para gastar en este tipo de bonos, y esperar cinco años sólo para conseguir seis. Bueno, para obtener el 6,5% de interés. Así que no tiene sentido para muchas personas.
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Me gustaría añadir que este bono también está... El rendimiento de este bono también está ligado al valor del Bitcoin. ¿Saben? Así que incluso estaban mencionando que el bono va a tener el mayor retorno de la inversión, ROI, si Bitcoin alcanza un millón de dólares. Así que eso te da una idea de lo descabellado que es, que vas a tener algunas ganancias de esta inversión, así que.
Cas Piancey:
Sólo quiero decir, para ser justos, que creo que la mayoría de los bonos que se venden en Estados Unidos, se venden a inversores extranjeros. Sólo para señalar, que creo que en general, los mercados de bonos, no se trata de ... Como, los bonos americanos no son para, en general, el inversor minorista medio americano para comprar. En un tiempo, ese fue probablemente el caso, creo, antes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, pero desde entonces, se ha convertido en mucho menos de una inversión para los inversores medios normales. Bennett, vas a mirar hacia arriba, y pretender que es una cosa normal. ¿Cuántos bonos posees, amigo?
Bennett Tomlin:
Eso no es lo que estoy pensando, amigo. Estoy pensando en el porcentaje de bonos del Tesoro de EE.UU. de nueva emisión, que acaban siendo comprados por la Fed, y en si todavía podríamos estar comprando una pluralidad de nuestros propios bonos.
Cas Piancey:
Pero eso es un.... Ese es otro tema en el que no vamos a entrar en este episodio, que... No pongamos a todo el mundo en el MMT, y los bichos de oro, y... Vamos a evitarlo. No quiero ir allí. Mantengámonos en el tema. Ustedes, obviamente, tienen familia y amigos en El Salvador. Así que mi pregunta para ustedes en este momento es, he escuchado de manera abrumadora que Nayib Bukele es apoyado por el público salvadoreño en general. ¿Crees que es justo decirlo? ¿Sus amigos y familiares... ¿Están contentos con el trabajo que ha hecho?
Oscar Salguero:
Mario, ¿quieres ir primero, o [crosstalk 00:16:19]?
Mario Gómez:
Bueno, es... El problema es que esto es algo difícil de medir, porque normalmente la forma en que se mide esto, es a través de encuestas. Es decir, normalmente se trata de gente que llama a números al azar, para tratar de preguntar a la gente si les gusta, o no, la forma en que el Presidente maneja el país. El tipo de respuesta que vas a obtener es [inaudible 00:16:52]. Les gusta la forma en que trabaja. Pero tienes que entender, que este no es el único presidente que tiene este... Quiero decir, una buena aprobación, en general. Es normal que empiecen a gustar a la gente, pero a medida que pasa el tiempo y no cumplen sus promesas, esta percepción empieza a cambiar. Así que por lo menos en mi familia, no creo que a nadie le guste, por lo que me pasó a mí. Pero creo que lo que pasa es que este tipo se enfoca en cosas que puede cumplir, y mostrar a todos, aunque no esté atacando los temas centrales del país. Así que esto es lo que le da estos altos niveles de aprobación, con los salvadoreños.
Oscar Salguero:
Me gustaría complementar esto, mencionando que normalmente hay dos fuentes de encuestas en El Salvador, que miden su popularidad. Una serán las encuestas pagadas por el gobierno, de empresas como [inaudible 00:18:03], y algo así. Pero incluso publican rankings presidenciales, y no es de extrañar que Nayib Bukele esté por encima de otros líderes del mundo, o algo así. La otra fuente, aparte de las encuestas patrocinadas por el gobierno, son las universidades, como la Universidad Centroamericana, o la Universidad Gerardo Barrios, y cuando contrastas los datos, las universidades siempre lo ponen, tal vez 10, o 15 puntos por debajo de las otras encuestadoras, cierto. Además, hay que entender, que su popularidad se basa en medidas muy populosas. Por ejemplo, dar a la gente en condiciones de pobreza una caja de comida, que ha estado regalando desde la pandemia, porque mucha gente perdió su trabajo. Hay mucho desempleo en este momento, en la clase media-baja, la clase baja. Así que...
Oscar Salguero:
Clase media baja, clase baja. Así que mira, los amigos y la familia, la familia extendida, no son tan felices. E incluso tenía costos que eran cien por ciento para él en el pasado. Pero después de todas estas medidas que han hecho bajar la economía y no están contentos. No están contentos porque saben que si tienen una tarjeta de crédito, si tienen una hipoteca o si tienen un préstamo para sus autos, ahora ese ranking de [El Salvador 00:19:33] los bancos está bajando. Ahora que la calificación de Moody's del país es CCC, todo se va a encarecer. Y también tenemos una crisis de inflación global. Así que sí, apuesto a que la gente estaría más contenta si el gobierno tomara medidas para proteger la economía, en lugar de simplemente dilapidar el dinero en marketing y usar la marca Bitcoin para impulsar una imagen que cuando vas a El Salvador y porque yo voy mucho a El Salvador, no ves un cambio real.
Oscar Salguero:
Ha sido lo mismo durante los últimos 33 años, y este gobierno tiene tres años y no se ven los cambios reales. Es como un montón de videos HD y videos 4K y renders 3D. Pero eso no significa ningún cambio para la gente. Así que eso es lo que pienso. Y la gente lo está notando. La gente se está dando cuenta.
Mario Gómez:
La verdad es que son bastante buenos haciendo renders.
Bennett Tomlin:
El jefe [crosstalk 00:20:33] del equipo de El Salvador Bitcoin es el de los renders 3D.
Mario Gómez:
No sé si recuerdas el render más antiguo que hicieron para la conferencia de Bitcoin en América Latina allá en El Salvador. Así que, sí, no quiero ver eso de nuevo pero
Bennett Tomlin:
Eera como un platillo volador. ¿No es así? ¿No era un platillo volante?
Oscar Salguero:
Sí.
Cas Piancey:
Sí.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Era un platillo volante.
Oscar Salguero:
¿Saben qué, chicos? Bennett y Mario, si superpongo el audio del tipo de Bitconnect a ese video, coincide perfectamente con el OVNI.
Mario Gómez:
Tal vez fue hecho por los mismos tipos.
Bennett Tomlin:
Tanto Bitconnect en El Salvador, acaba de ir en fiver y ha hecho clic en la primera [inaudible 00:21:20] persona para renders 3D.
Cas Piancey:
Ok. Perdón por volver a un tema más serio rápidamente aquí, Mario. Mencionaste que nadie en tu familia es fanático de Nayib Bukele, por lo que te sucedió. ¿Te importaría ampliar eso para nuestros oyentes? Porque tal vez algunos de nuestros oyentes no están familiarizados con lo que pasó.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Bien. Lo que sucedió fue que todo lo relacionado con el Bitcoin se mantiene como secreto de parada para el gobierno. Así que un par de días antes de que lanzaran este monedero Chivo, el monedero Bitcoin oficial del gobierno, pudimos conseguir un par de diapositivas de la aplicación y lo compartí a través de mi cuenta de Twitter porque no tenemos nada sobre la aplicación. Así que traté de explicar a la gente lo que estaba en estas diapositivas de PowerPoint para explicar, de acuerdo, esto se parece a la aplicación y estas son las características que van a presentar. Y bueno, eso era lo único que hacía. Al día siguiente iba a mi trabajo y la policía me estaba esperando fuera de mi casa. Así que me arrestaron. Me llevaron allí y no me permitieron hablar con mis abogados.
Mario Gómez:
Nunca mostraron una orden, y tampoco explicaron por qué me estaban arrestando y bueno, afortunadamente pude notificar a la gente en Twitter, no directamente, pero tengo contacto con los varios grupos de amigos. Así que les dije que no sé qué está pasando. Me están llevando a la policía y no sé qué está pasando. Así que si no saben de mí en un par de horas, por favor, levanten la voz. Así lo hicieron. Y la respuesta fue tan grande por parte de toda la gente que tuvieron que liberarme, pero se llevaron mis teléfonos móviles hasta el día de hoy, casi seis meses después. No sé dónde están. Y no sé qué están haciendo con ellos o qué están planeando con todo esto. Entonces, y es una locura, muchos políticos empezaron a decir que yo era una especie de estafador que estaba...
Mario Gómez:
Hubo algunos problemas con los bancos un par de días antes, así que intentaron acusarme de piratear los bancos y cosas así. Así que fue una locura. Así que sí, esa es la razón por la que a mi familia no le gusta la administración de Bukele en general. Así que, y tienen...
Cas Piancey:
Una buena razón.
Mario Gómez:
Base para [inaudible 00:24:22] buenas razones.
Oscar Salguero:
Quiero añadir que yo estaba en El Salvador cuando te pasó eso, Mario y me alarmé bastante y formé parte de ese grupo de personas que levantaron la voz en Twitter. Y obviamente fue un arresto injusto, como dijo Mario, sin orden judicial, sin razón alguna para llevarse sus dispositivos. Sí. Fue realmente aterrador porque fue como una intimidación para todos, todos los que estaban alzando la voz y tratando de informar al público sobre este gran cambio con respecto a Bitcoin, porque toda esta información ha sido reservada y considerada secreta. No es lo mismo que hace tres años, cuando podías ir a la página web del Ministerio de Economía y tener acceso a una sección de transparencia o a una página web de transparencia, todo eso ha desaparecido. Y todo esto se ha considerado información de alto secreto para los próximos siete años.
Oscar Salguero:
Cuánto se invirtió en el marketing de Bitcoin, cuánto se invirtió en la creación del monedero Chivo, cuáles fueron los socios internacionales, hubo algún concurso para contratarlos o simplemente fueron contratados porque alguien en el gobierno señaló con el dedo y dijo, oh, quiero contratar a esta empresa y a esta empresa y a esta empresa para crear el backend y el sistema de cajeros automáticos y la aplicación para el monedero Chivo. Así que mucha gente ha estado hablando y levantando la voz y reuniendo los pequeños trozos de información para mantener a la gente informada. Y Mario fue uno de ellos y por eso fue el objetivo.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Y me gustaría señalar que... Quiero decir, yo vivo en El Salvador toda mi vida y nunca temí en ningún momento que fuera a ser blanco del gobierno sólo por decir las cosas que vi hasta ese día, y creo que es lo peor porque es un país completamente diferente al que yo viví toda mi vida, porque nunca temí sólo hablar y decir la verdad y decir permiso y... Pero ahora es diferente, la gente tiene miedo y temen que si empiezan a decir cosas sobre el gobierno y pueden convertirse en un objetivo como yo.
Bennett Tomlin:
Hay tantas cosas malas en esas historias, ¿verdad? Como esto, un arresto sin orden judicial, sólo liberado después de una presión significativa, tratando de adoptar esta transparencia que se defiende sobre la base de su transparencia y luego tratando de ocultar todo, es preocupante.
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Y quiero mencionar que los gobiernos que tuvimos en los últimos 30 años antes de este, eran corruptos. Eran malos. Dejaron muchas promesas sin cumplir, pero la libertad de expresión durante esos 30 años era mucho mejor que la que hay ahora. Y una de las pruebas que quiero darles es que gracias a que tuvimos estas instituciones de transparencia en El Salvador y que todos los diferentes poderes del Estado tienen una sección de transparencia en sus sitios web, liberando documentos para que el público los vea y para que los periodistas tengan acceso a ellos. Tenemos un ex presidente que está en la cárcel, y tenemos otro ex presidente que es un fugitivo, que está exiliado en Nicaragua. Esto demuestra que la responsabilidad, el periodismo de investigación, la búsqueda en estos sitios web, la búsqueda de documentos, la publicación de artículos, la existencia de un fiscal independiente, un sistema judicial independiente, todo ello en la joven democracia de El Salvador, que obviamente no era perfecto, pero que estaba empezando a funcionar.
Oscar Salguero:
Y teníamos a estos dos ex presidentes, uno del partido de izquierda FMLN y otro del partido de derecha Arena, uno preso y otro prófugo. Bueno, ahora hay dos prófugos del FMLN porque hay un segundo que se fue a Nicaragua a pedir asilo. Así que al menos, las instituciones estaban como funcionando y estas personas estaban en la cárcel o eran prófugos, pero ahora este gobierno acaba de borrar todas las organizaciones de transparencia, y no tenemos idea de cómo se está gastando el dinero. El dinero de los contribuyentes salvadoreños es como la caja chica para ellos. No sabemos en qué lo gastan.
Cas Piancey:
Así que esa es otra cuestión que en realidad quiero abordar, y es que creo que... y Estados Unidos ha... seamos sinceros, contribuido en su justa medida a cuestiones y problemas que están presentes en América Latina, en toda América Latina. Creo que es una buena manera de describir lo que Estados Unidos ha hecho en América Central y América Latina, pero me resulta interesante que sugieras que se siente mucho más autoritario bajo Nayib, porque cuando Bennett y yo hicimos nuestro primer episodio sobre Nayib Bukele, creo que nos reservamos mucho el juicio. No tratábamos de ir allí. No queríamos declarar a este tipo, un dictador, autoritario. No sabíamos qué esperar de él, pero me parece que ambos están firmemente en el campo de... ha habido un cambio drástico en los últimos años y no para la libertad de las personas en nuestro país.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Creo que esa es la cuestión porque esto, todo va muy rápido. Quiero decir, lo primero que hicieron fue cambiar al fiscal general, sustituyen al máximo tribunal constitucional. Así que el problema es que esencialmente pueden aprobar cualquier tipo de leyes que quieran. Y no tienes, como ciudadano, ningún recurso para tratar de defenderte.
Mario Gómez:
Porque normalmente, al menos en los gobiernos anteriores, si sientes o crees que el gobierno ha sido injusto contigo, puedes ir al tribunal constitucional y ellos pueden intentar hacer algo, cierto. Pero ya no es el caso. Así que es algo que nos preocupa mucho porque, quiero decir, está haciendo el trabajo muy duro para toda la gente que trabaja en derechos humanos, la gente que está luchando en general, para mejorar la situación en El Salvador, ahora son objetivos del gobierno. Y la forma en que el gobierno ataca a las personas es una, tratando de atacar su imagen en las redes sociales principalmente. Puedes ver esto... No sé cómo decirlo porque tienes esta legión de trolls atacando a la gente que está en contra del gobierno. Creo que esa es la mejor descripción y...
Oscar Salguero:
Sí, tienen granjas de trolls y si criticas a algún miembro del gabinete, muy pronto tendrás a alguien enviando al ejército de trolls a por ti. Así que sí. Mira una parte de la popularidad de Nayib Bukele, no tenemos que ... tenemos que recordar que es porque él ha dominado el uso de los medios de comunicación social y que en realidad le ayudan mucho a ser elegido. Y utiliza los medios sociales para inclinar lo que está de moda en las noticias.
Cas Piancey:
Aquí lo llamamos culto a la personalidad, así que...
Oscar Salguero:
Sí, es un culto a la personalidad. Y lo que Mario estaba tratando de transmitir, supongo, Mario, es que hacen personajes, como mencionó-
Mario Gómez:
Sí, esa es la palabra.
Oscar Salguero:
Que cualquiera que esté en contra de ellos... eso es lo que hacen.
Cas Piancey:
Puedo rápidamente... Sólo quiero hacer una pregunta, lo siento. Así que ambos me hablan de este panóptico, usamos esa palabra un montón en el último episodio, el panóptico del gobierno, una especie de vigilancia de todo lo que ustedes están diciendo. Y permítanme expresar esto en una luz diferente a la de El Salvador, donde pasé toda mi vida en los EE.UU., pero pasé una parte significativa de tiempo antes del coronavirus en China. Y puedo decir que nunca me he sentido más seguro en toda mi vida que cuando estaba en China. No me iban a asaltar. No me iban a disparar. No me iba a pasar nada malo a no ser que fuera un esbirro del gobierno el que me metiera en la cárcel, pero nunca me he sentido más seguro. Me pregunto si Nayib ha hecho que El Salvador se sienta más seguro.
Mario Gómez:
No lo creo.
Oscar Salguero:
No, en absoluto. No, porque lo que se ve en las imágenes que se ven en los medios de comunicación, los soldados que van por ahí, no están cumpliendo realmente su misión. En primer lugar, tenemos la policía, la policía nacional civil, esos chicos tienen la misión de mantener a todo el mundo a salvo. Se supone que el ejército no debe estar en las calles haciendo este tipo de tareas de seguridad civil, pero no, no es seguro chicos. Miren, ustedes pueden ir a El Salvador a los lugares turísticos, pueden ir a los barrios de clase media, a los barrios caros también y no los van a asaltar pero si ustedes son la otra persona que toma el transporte público y vive en un barrio conflictivo que está dominado por una de las pandillas, están en riesgo y no pueden caminar.... si vives en un barrio, no puedes ir andando al barrio de al lado porque lo que va a pasar es que los pandilleros, te van a pedir el DNI para verificar tu dirección y si no vives allí, pasarán al menos dos cosas.
Oscar Salguero:
Una, es que te van a pedir dinero, te van a extorsionar para dejarte ir. Y la otra es que probablemente ya no saldrás vivo de ese barrio, así que es así de inseguro en algunos barrios malos, pero quizás el 90% del país es seguro. Si viajas allí, vas a las playas y a la playa de Bitcoin y demás, será seguro para ti. Y también como salvadoreño, tengo sentido común y soy inteligente en la calle y sé dónde ir y dónde no, así que eso también ayuda. Pero quería volver al tema de Bitcoin y al tema de las criptomonedas, porque es realmente irónico, cierto. Que Bitcoin se suponía que era una herramienta para la libertad financiera de los individuos. Y ahora está siendo utilizado por un gobierno que es cada vez más autoritario, cierto. Y ves a la comunidad de Bitcoin, son libertarios, son todo tipo de personas, pero no parecen molestarse.
Cas Piancey:
Ahora prefieren voluntarios, que es el colmo de la hipocresía con lo que estás hablando pero...
Oscar Salguero:
Pero parece que no les importa quién usa e impulsa el Bitcoin, siempre y cuando el número suba. Así que, sí, es realmente triste e irónico que este tipo de tecnología, en lugar de ser utilizada para lo que se pretendía inicialmente, haya evolucionado hasta convertirse en una herramienta para una horrible distopía tan...
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Y me gustaría añadir que la mayor parte de la percepción de la mejora de la situación de seguridad en El Salvador se debe a que el número o la tasa de homicidios se ha reducido. Pero el problema es que esa es una medida de seguridad complicada. Primero, porque las extorsiones a los negocios es algo que todavía sucede y sucede mucho. No puedes tener un pequeño negocio allí porque sabes que en algún momento, algún pandillero te va a pedir dinero, si quieres seguir operando. Y la otra cosa que no se suele denunciar es la desaparición de personas. Y tenemos muchos desaparecidos en El Salvador. Y estos dos números son... No vas a oír hablar de esto porque obviamente el gobierno no quiere que parezca que está fallando.
Mario Gómez:
Y el único número que pueden controlar, creo que hubo un episodio en [VICE 00:37:19] hace un par de meses, donde algunos miembros de las pandillas explicaron que pueden controlar los números de... pueden y reducir el número de homicidios, sólo para mostrar que tienen el control de este número. Así que esa es la situación real y es una locura porque la gente ve que hay menos tasa de homicidios, pero sí, en realidad, nada ha cambiado. Y muchos de nosotros sospechamos que hay algún tipo de verdad entre las pandillas y el gobierno.
Bennett Tomlin:
Mencionaste el fracaso del gobierno, así que creo que ahora sería un gran momento para discutir el día de Bitcoin cuando
Bennett Tomlin:
Creo que ahora sería un buen momento para hablar del día del Bitcoin, cuando el Bitcoin se convirtió oficialmente en moneda de curso legal en El Salvador. Así que Oscar, ¿puedes describir brevemente tus experiencias y las cosas que viste en el día del Bitcoin?
Oscar Salguero:
Mira, Bennett. Soy un desarrollador de móviles. He estado creando aplicaciones durante los últimos 10 años, así que estaba realmente ansioso en septiembre del año pasado por descargar Chivo Wallet en mis dispositivos y empezar a usarlo. Así que eso es lo que hice, pero desafortunadamente durante las primeras tres o cuatro horas, aparentemente no hicieron el sistema elástico, no tenían la capacidad del servidor para manejar la demanda, así que se estrelló. Así que fue muy divertido, porque después de su lanzamiento, el presidente en Twitter tratando de ser como la atención al cliente para la aplicación y diciendo a la gente, "Estamos teniendo una interrupción en este momento. Por favor, inténtelo de nuevo más tarde. Si tiene problemas con la aplicación, desinstálela y vuelva a instalarla", y todo eso.
Oscar Salguero:
Así que la experiencia inicial de todos los salvadoreños con Chivo Wallet fue que no podían descargarlo, y la segunda parte de la experiencia fue que el KYC estaba fallando y el KYC consistía en que tomabas una foto de tu documento nacional de identidad que se llama el [duey 00:39:26], el frente y la parte de atrás, y también tomabas una selfie de ti mismo. La gente estaba jugando con la aplicación y tomando una foto de una taza o una foto de una planta y la cosa funcionaba. Así que aparentemente el KYC no estaba bien afinado. Así que tenían estos problemas técnicos. Como desarrollador, como ingeniero de software, puedo decir que esos problemas se han resuelto. Ahora la aplicación funciona. Tardaron una semana en solucionarlo, pero después surgieron más problemas, entre ellos que intentabas enviar una transacción entre la red de forros y la transacción se quedaba atascada durante días. Veías que tu dinero estaba como congelado allí.
Oscar Salguero:
Otro fenómeno que ocurrió es que los delincuentes empezaron a hacerse pasar por personas. En El Salvador, nunca ha habido leyes de protección de datos y la base de datos, los datos nacionales de las identificaciones nacionales, es algo que está rodando. Hay un mercado negro para ese tipo de información que se vende y se compra. Así que sí, algunos criminales que eran expertos en tecnología o algo así, se hizo con esta base de datos de las identificaciones nacionales que incluyen su DOB. Fecha de nacimiento, foto, nombre, apellido, la ciudad en la que vives, y esos eran los datos que tenías que introducir en Chivo Wallet para poder entrar, crear una cuenta y conseguir tu regalo de 30 dólares.
Oscar Salguero:
Lo que sucedió es que ese regalo de 30 dólares fue enviado de una billetera a otra, y en cuanto los cajeros automáticos funcionaron, algunas personas fueron al cajero y cobraron los 30 dólares. Esa fue la experiencia inicial con Chivo Wallet y miles de salvadoreños fueron suplantados y sus identidades fueron usadas para crear una cuenta, entre ellos familiares y amigos míos que se supone son conocedores de la tecnología. Pero sí, fue algo fortuito y al principio no quise descargar la aplicación, pero luego me dominó la curiosidad de desarrollador y la conseguí. Hasta la fecha, he realizado más de 200 transacciones en Chivo Wallet. He realizado todo tipo de transacciones. Como inmigrante, también he intentado usarlo para enviar remesas, así que también puedo contar cómo va eso, pero quiero darle la palabra a Mario. Así que tal vez Mario pueda complementar algunas cosas.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Creo que lo que pasa con el Chivo Wallet es que mucha gente se lo descarga porque le regalan estos 30 dólares en equivalente a Bitcoin en la aplicación. Fue un poco gracioso porque desde el primer día hubo una especie de mercado negro para estos 30 dólares, porque puedes encontrar en las publicaciones de Facebook gente que te paga 15 o 20 dólares para poder cobrar tus 30 dólares. Porque al final, para algunas personas, era realmente difícil descargar la aplicación y seguir el proceso. Así que había gente que pagaba menos del precio real, sólo para sacar ese dinero de los cajeros. Los cajeros tampoco funcionaban tan bien. A día de hoy, hay muchos cajeros automáticos que ya no funcionan, pero aparentemente esto tiene que ver con la empresa que los proporcionó.
Mario Gómez:
Al parecer Athena ha tenido muchos problemas a nivel interno a la hora de suministrar estos cajeros. Por lo que escuché, no sé si es una situación, pero aparentemente no pueden actualizar el software de los cajeros automáticos y esta es la razón por la que algunos de ellos ya no funcionan. Avanzando seis meses, creo que la mejor medida del uso de la aplicación son los números que el gobierno ha compartido sobre el número de remesas que reportan en criptomoneda. Supongo que este número lo obtienen de la billetera Chivo, porque no creo que haya otra forma en que puedan rastrear realmente el dinero que fluye hacia El Salvador. Quiero decir, la cantidad que están transfiriendo es cada vez menor mes a mes. Así que sí, no parece que el principal caso de uso para enviar remesas esté realmente funcionando. Es sólo un pequeño porcentaje del total, creo que es menos del 1% del total de las remesas enviadas a El Salvador.
Mario Gómez:
Cuando miras los números, hay una asociación de negocios allá en El Salvador. Hicieron una encuesta a principios de este año y preguntaron a los empresarios si usaban Bitcoin y el 90% dijo que no lo usaba en absoluto. El 10% restante, el 4%, dice que ayudó a aumentar sus ventas, pero alrededor del 5% también dice que en realidad redujo sus ventas, supongo, porque tal vez tuvieron algún problema con la plataforma o con la volatilidad. Así que sí, quiero decir, Chivo Wallet funciona más o menos para la gente que lo utiliza, pero al final del día, está siendo utilizado por personas que en su mayoría quieren especular. El caso de uso que se vendió a la población, no creo que realmente esté funcionando para la mayoría de la gente.
Oscar Salguero:
Sí, estoy de acuerdo. Las transacciones del día a día no están funcionando, pero algunas personas probablemente están comerciando en el día con la aplicación y ese es básicamente el espacio de uso que tiene probablemente los usuarios activos diarios de Chivo Wallet. Mira, como inmigrante en los Estados Unidos con familia en El Salvador, he estado enviando remesas para ayudar a mi gente a pagar algunas cosas, pagar mis propias deudas y lo que sea, durante la última década, tal vez más. He utilizado todas las herramientas disponibles para los salvadoreños que puedas imaginar. En los primeros meses que estuve en los Estados Unidos, no tenía un número de seguridad social porque tenía una visa G4, una visa de diplomático, y la forma en que enviaba dinero era básicamente yendo a una Western Union en una pequeña bodega en Washington DC. Así es como enviaba dinero a los miembros de mi familia [inaudible 00:46:31].
Oscar Salguero:
Después de eso, cuando obtuve mi SSN, pude abrir una cuenta bancaria y tener una licencia de conducir y también obtener esta aplicación de Zoom para enviar dinero a El Salvador. No hay nada más práctico que Zoom. Por ejemplo, si quieres enviar 1000 dólares, 1000 dólares americanos, te va a cobrar 14,99 o 13,99 como comisión.
Cas Piancey:
¿Es una filial de PayPal?
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Sí. Es una filial de PayPal. El dinero está casi instantáneamente en tu cuenta bancaria en El Salvador, así que básicamente refleja una transacción ACH dentro de los Estados Unidos, pero lo hace internacionalmente. Pero ahora quiero decir esto. Soy una excepción entre los 2,5 millones de salvadoreños que vivirán en Estados Unidos porque mi situación migratoria no es irregular. Pero si piensas en la mayoría de mis compatriotas salvadoreños, no tienen número de seguridad social, no tienen licencia de conducir, y lo que pasa; si realmente quieres usar Bitcoin para enviar remesas como a El Salvador y ayudar a esta gente que envía otro torrente de 200, 300 dólares al mes a Salvador y no quieres que los Zooms o los Western Unions del mundo se lleven cinco o 10 dólares, que creo que la comisión nunca pasa del 5%. A veces es el 2%. ¿Pero qué pasa?
Oscar Salguero:
No puedes abrir una cuenta en Coinbase si no tienes un SSN, si no tienes una identificación nacional de los Estados Unidos, o una licencia de conducir. Así que hay una barrera para las concesiones inmediatas en los Estados Unidos para adquirir este tipo de forma de compra de Bitcoin, incluso si quieren descargar Strike, que fue la aplicación que se dio a conocer al principio, tienen que pasar por un proceso de KYC y proporcionar una identificación. Así que en la práctica, sólo la gente que tiene estatus migratorio como la visa H1B, que es el permiso de trabajo, tal vez algunos diplomáticos, tal vez algunos residentes como yo, vamos a ser capaces de crear legalmente una cuenta en un intercambio de criptomonedas por Bitcoin o tal vez en Strike y luego enviarlo a mi familia o amigo en El Salvador usando Chivo Wallet. Pero no es práctico. La gran mayoría de los salvadoreños que envían remesas, no podrían usarlo.
Mario Gómez:
Sólo quiero señalar que incluso con el Chivo Wallet, se necesita esa tarjeta de crédito o débito para comprar Bitcoin, incluso si no están pidiendo un número de seguro social o cualquier identificación válida en los EE.UU. Así que usted no tiene una manera de evadir el hecho de que usted necesita para hacer una transacción con los bancos tradicionales y los sistemas de pago tradicionales. La única manera de que la gente puede enviar dinero real utilizando Chivo Wallet fue ir a estos consulados de El Salvador alrededor de los EE.UU. y utilizar uno de los cajeros automáticos Chivo allí. Así que usted puede ir con su dinero en efectivo, ponerlo en la máquina y enviarlo a la gente allá en El Salvador. Pero no tiene sentido porque nadie va a pasar la mitad de su día yendo al consulado para usar un cajero automático para enviar dinero a El Salvador. Así que el caso de uso al final del día, y después de seis meses, no tiene mucho sentido.
Bennett Tomlin:
Sí. Ciertamente no parece que esté ganando claramente a Western Union aquí. Así que la otra parte de lo que se suponía que era la Chivo Wallet y lo que se suponía que lograría todo este proyecto de ley de curso legal de Bitcoin es que los comerciantes se suponía que, estaban obligados a aceptar Bitcoin tan pronto como tuvieran la capacidad técnica. Mario, ya compartiste esa estadística de este grupo de negocios en El Salvador que sugiere que la gran mayoría de ellos no han aceptado Bitcoin. ¿Esto se debe a que la mayoría de los negocios todavía no aceptan Bitcoin, o simplemente no hay nadie que quiera pagar usando Bitcoin?
Mario Gómez:
Esa es una muy buena pregunta. Bueno, la cosa es que normalmente lo que puedes hacer en El Salvador es simplemente decir: "Bueno, no tengo forma de recibir pagos de Bitcoin", y supuestamente eso te libera de la obligación de recibir incluso pagos de Bitcoin y eso podría funcionar, pero el problema es que tenemos esta oficina de protección al consumidor, y el problema es que cualquiera puede reportar tu negocio. Si vas allí y no estás recibiendo pagos de Bitcoin, pueden ir a la oficina de protección al consumidor y llenar un informe para decir: "Mario no está aceptando Bitcoin". Así que pueden ir a tu negocio, hacer una inspección, y si no cumples o no tienes medios para aceptar Bitcoin, pueden encontrarte. Así que esa es la cosa con el negocio. Obviamente, si no hay mucha gente que use Bitcoin para pagar, no vas a ver muchos informes de gente multada por no aceptar Bitcoin, pero es algo que podría ocurrir.
Mario Gómez:
Tenemos un informe de una pequeña tienda donde esta oficina de protección vino sólo para verificar si aceptaban Bitcoin allí. Así que sí, esa es la cosa con el negocio. La mayoría de la gente, lo que está haciendo es esencialmente sólo la descarga de la aplicación o es una especie de diversión porque a veces se descargan ... oímos los informes de las personas que cargan la aplicación Chivo para su negocio porque saben que a veces no funciona. Así que si la aplicación oficial del gobierno no funciona, bueno, eso es una muy buena excusa para no aceptar Bitcoin. Así que es una especie de locura.
Oscar Salguero:
En realidad, quiero añadir que la última vez que estuve allí en enero, fui a varios lugares y trató de pagar con Chivo Wallet o [MonWallet 00:53:07] y vi que la gente es realmente creativa y que en realidad la investigación y un par de lugares, que están utilizando nodo abierto para un proveedor de terceros que llegaron a cumplir con la ley. Había otro lugar que es como una franquicia tipo Subway, pero no es Subway, que tenía un pequeño cartel al lado de la caja registradora diciendo que estaban trabajando entre los puertos en una solución y que la empresa de TI que era el proveedor se retrasó y esa era la razón por la que no estaban aceptando Bitcoin. Pero sí, la Chivo Wallet tiene básicamente tres modos. Puedes ser un individuo, puedes ser una empresa o puedes ser un punto de venta.
Oscar Salguero:
La mayoría de las veces, la transacción en el punto de venta falla. Te dan tu bocadillo, te dan tu pupusa o algo así, y tienes que esperar un tiempo a que aparezca la transacción. Lo que les ocurría a muchos comerciantes era que proporcionaban el producto o los servicios, el consumidor lo utilizaba o se comía el bocadillo o algo así y seguían esperando los pagos. Algunos de los otros tipos, había un tipo que hizo algunos negocios que [inaudible 00:54:26] al principio y tenía 300 dólares de dinero allí. Cuando conectó su cuenta de cheques o ahorros o cuenta del banco salvadoreño y quería transferir el dinero de la Chivo Wallet al banco, que en El Salvador tenemos transacciones ACH desde hace décadas. Es algo que tenemos. No funcionó y los 300 dólares se atascaron en el sistema y tuvo que llamar a la línea de atención al cliente para desatascarlo.
Oscar Salguero:
Yo mismo, una de las últimas pruebas que hice hace unos meses es que envié 1.000 dólares a una dirección de MonWallet y esa transacción tardó 19 días en salir adelante y tuve que llamar tres veces al servicio de atención al cliente. Sí. Si volvemos al componente en el que no quieres estar bajo este panóptico de control gubernamental... esto es lo más gracioso. Un jueves envié una transacción de 19 dólares desde mi billetera Chivo a una dirección de MonWallet. No se realizó y el viernes, 24 horas después, recibí una llamada a mi celular salvadoreño, donde tengo instalado Chivo Wallet, del servicio de atención al cliente de Chivo Wallet, disculpándose porque la transacción no se realizó y que el saldo del dinero que envié debería estar en mi cuenta.
Oscar Salguero:
Así que si descargo MonWallet en cualquier parte del mundo, y tengo mi Bitcoin allí, no hay ningún gobierno que me esté rastreando y no hay nadie que sepa cuánto dinero estoy transando allí. Pero con Chivo Wallet, está tan controlado por el gobierno que no hay privacidad en absoluto. Decías, Cas, en el último podcast que te gusta el dinero en efectivo porque es privado y puedes gastarlo como quieras, y nadie te va a rastrear. Bueno, Chivo Wallet no funciona como dinero en efectivo, a pesar de que tiene un saldo en Bitcoin y un saldo en USD.
Cas Piancey:
Sólo quiero decir que me sorprende la idea de un tiempo de espera de 19 días para una transferencia de 1.000 dólares, especialmente a un lugar como El Salvador, donde a veces se trata de dinero de vida o muerte.
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Son como tres meses de salario.
Cas Piancey:
Exactamente. Eso no son 1.000 dólares en Los Ángeles, California o lo que sea. Es dinero real, serio. La idea de que se quede colgado durante tres semanas, me deja boquiabierto. Puedo enviar dinero a China ahora mismo y tomará...
Cas Piancey:
Me está sorprendiendo. Puedo enviar dinero a China ahora mismo y tardará dos días. Estados Unidos odia a China. Es fácil para mí enviar dinero allí. Esto es una completa locura para mí. Es una completa locura.
Bennett Tomlin:
Sí. Así que supongo que una de las últimas cosas por las que tengo curiosidad es por saber qué piensan los salvadoreños sobre la playa de Bitcoin.
Mario Gómez:
Es un poco loco todo lo relacionado con Bitcoin Beach. Primero, el nombre real del lugar es El Zonte. Y le cambiaron el nombre, no oficial, pero porque el lugar, sigue teniendo su nombre, a Playa Bitcoin porque empezaron con esto durante la pandemia cuando la gente en medio de los cierres, recibió esta donación de Bitcoin. Si no me equivoco, fueron alrededor de nueve Bitcoins los que recibieron. Y luego usaron esto para pagar a la gente localmente para hacer todo tipo de compras. Para la mayoría de la gente, creo que era sólo la curiosidad de que pueden visitar. Una de las cosas que la gente vive dentro de las ciudades en El Salvador es que normalmente vas el fin de semana a la playa porque está bastante cerca o durante la semana. Así que la mayoría de la gente sólo fue allí porque quieren ir a un [inaudible 00:58:36] cajero automático allí a través de un Bitcoin. Y luego gastarlo en el par de pequeños negocios alrededor.
Mario Gómez:
Y eso fue, "Oh". Pero ya sabes, la gente detrás del proyecto Bitcoin Beach, te van a decir que es una comunidad totalmente Bitcoinizada algo así. Y todo el mundo lo utiliza para pagar todo. Pero cuando vas allí, ves que no es el caso. Primero, todos los precios están en dólares. Así que obviamente les interesa cambiar y cambiar su Bitcoin a dólares, porque al final del día, necesitan a alguien en algún momento para comprar cualquier cosa fuera de esa comunidad. Así que necesitan cambiarlo a dólares.
Mario Gómez:
Y en segundo lugar, tuvimos la oportunidad de ir allí y hablar con la gente que no estaba usando Bitcoin. Y las razones que nos dieron fue que no podían hacer frente a la volatilidad de Bitcoin porque viven el día a día. Así que uno de los problemas que tenían era que podían recibir pagos, pero luego necesitaban el dinero para el día siguiente. Y a veces el cajero automático no tenía dinero. O tienen que esperar. O necesitan transferir el Bitcoin a otra persona para que les de dólares.
Cas Piancey:
Y tal vez tarda 19 malditos días en recibir sus dólares estadounidenses, ¿verdad?
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Fue una locura porque una de las chicas con las que estuvimos hablando allí nos dijo que, por alguna razón, el cajero automático no funcionaba después de las 5:00 o las 6:00 de la tarde. Así que si terminas tu día después de las 5:00 o 6:00, encontrarás el cajero cerrado. Así que probablemente no podrás conseguir el dinero para comprar las cosas que necesitas para el día siguiente. Lo que nos dijeron es que los que realmente usaban Bitcoin eran los grandes negocios. Los dueños de hoteles, los dueños de restaurantes que tienen mucha más liquidez. Y obviamente lo vendían como una inversión porque pueden comprar 500, 1000 dólares en Bitcoin y pueden esperar...
Cas Piancey:
Acurrucándose. Sólo se están acurrucando.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Así que la realidad era completamente diferente de lo que se está vendiendo. Y todo lo que rodea al Bitcoin en El Salvador, no hay ninguna transparencia. Le he pedido a Peterson muchas veces que nos diga qué están haciendo con el Bitcoin. Si tienen algún tipo de balance para que veamos cómo fluye el dinero, si tienen alguna medida para decir que la implementación de Bitcoin fue un éxito. Y dicen que no pueden compartir nada de eso porque no trabajan para nosotros. Y por qué queremos saber sobre eso.
Mario Gómez:
Y pensarás que es algo básico. Si estás dirigiendo una organización sin ánimo de lucro, deberías tener una forma de informar de lo que estás haciendo con el dinero que la gente te está donando. Y esta gente no puede darte los números más simples para evaluar realmente si la playa de Bitcoin es realmente un éxito. O para mí, no lo sé. Parece que hay algo que falta allí. Se ve bien cuando estás lejos de la playa real, pero cuando llegas allí y hablas con la gente, no es como la imagen.
Bennett Tomlin:
Y suena a que los negocios que dices aceptan y potencialmente se quedan con parte del Bitcoin, gastan el Bitcoin e intentan utilizarlo. Me parece que los tipos de negocios que describes son los que potencialmente atraerían más a los turistas extranjeros ricos en Bitcoin que están interesados en esta playa donde la gente acepta Bitcoin.
Oscar Salguero:
Hoteles, restaurantes en la zona. Sí. Y mira, quiero mencionar algo. Si la gran máxima de los Bitcoiners se verifica en la confianza, en El Salvador eso es imposible. Porque este proyecto de Bitcoin Beach no está abierto con su sistema. No hay un lugar donde podamos ir a echar mano de ese balance que mencionó Mario, para ver si esta ONG está trabajando de manera transparente de la misma manera que Chivo Wallet no te da el hash para que puedas ir a cualquier explorador de blockchain y ver las transacciones. Y ni siquiera podemos saber dónde están los Bitcoins que compró el país. Así que hay tanta oscuridad alrededor de todo este tema, que si eres realmente como un buen Bitcoiner y quieres verificar y no confiar, eso va a ser imposible para ti en cualquier nivel.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Y creo que este es el problema central de todo, la falta de transparencia. No hay manera de verificar lo que está sucediendo. Creo que varios periódicos tratan de obtener la información sobre este fondo fiduciario que supuestamente se utiliza para poder convertir entre Bitcoin y dólares. Y lo que el gobierno dice a los periodistas es que esta información es secreta porque hay secreto bancario, lo cual es una mentira. Porque no hay ninguna ley que diga que se puede ocultar el uso de los fondos públicos. Pero ellos dicen que es un secreto.
Mario Gómez:
Y lo otro son todas las empresas involucradas en esto. Chivo Wallet es el monedero oficial del gobierno, pero al mismo tiempo está gestionado por una empresa privada que se financió con dinero público. Así que no tenemos forma de obtener información porque hay algún precedente de que podemos preguntar a las empresas privadas sobre el uso de los fondos, si son fondos públicos. Pero el problema es que no tenemos ninguna forma de pedirles que nos den un informe, que nos den información sobre sus fondos o sobre cómo gastan todo.
Cas Piancey:
Para que la gente entienda a lo que creo que te estás refiriendo en este momento es que la gente como Bennett y yo en los Estados Unidos tenemos lo que se llama una solicitud de FOIA para que podamos seguir adelante y solicitar información específica del gobierno sobre la base de nuestros derechos como ciudadanos de ese gobierno. Estás diciendo que eso no existe en El Salvador.
Mario Gómez:
Existe en la ley, en la práctica, con respecto a todo lo relacionado con Bitcoin es simplemente imposible en este momento.
Cas Piancey:
De acuerdo.
Oscar Salguero:
Y es que teníamos esta institución que se llamaba IAIP y que era una de las instituciones que vigilaba todo este aspecto de la transparencia en la gobernanza. Pero esa es otra institución que ha sido desmantelada en los últimos dos años. Así que sí, no hay manera de hacer una solicitud de FOIA en El Salvador. Pero creo que también, se nos olvidó mencionar que el Congreso de los Estados Unidos había solicitado hace un par de semanas un proyecto de ley para investigar la implementación de Bitcoin en El Salvador. Y esa solicitud fue aprobada. Así que va a haber una investigación natural del Congreso de EE.UU. con respecto a este asunto.
Oscar Salguero:
Así que toda la información que se ha mantenido en secreto para El Salvador y para la gente y el mundo podría aparecer en el futuro debido a esta investigación. Y El Salvador no es una isla, no está aislado. Tiene que cumplir con FATCA, tiene que cumplir con FinCEN. Está en el sistema bancario Swift. [US Salvadoran 01:07:05], que está moviendo más de $5,000, tiene que llenar un formulario. Y si es residente de los Estados Unidos, tiene que cumplir con las cosas de FATCA también. Así que El Salvador no es como un lugar sin ley en el gran escenario mundial. O no está exento de estos acuerdos internacionales o así.
Cas Piancey:
No es Corea del Norte dices.
Oscar Salguero:
Sí. Todavía no, al menos.
Cas Piancey:
Esperemos que nunca. Pero lo que sí quiero decir ahora rápidamente, lo siento chicos, es que, Oscar, quiero dejar esto contigo. Y luego Mario, tú entras justo después. ¿Qué es lo más importante que deben saber todos los que están escuchando ahora mismo? Y si ustedes están dispuestos, nos encantaría tenerlos de nuevo en cualquier momento. Creo que tenemos que recibir actualizaciones periódicas sobre El Salvador. Tenemos que recibir actualizaciones regulares sobre lo que está pasando en América Latina con todo este asunto. Creo que es muy, muy importante.
Cas Piancey:
Pero Oscar, empecemos por ti. ¿Qué quieres que sepan nuestros oyentes al salir de este episodio?
Oscar Salguero:
Claro, mira, quiero que sepas que la implementación de Bitcoin en El Salvador fue una sorpresa para un 100% de El Salvador hasta junio de 2021. Esto no es algo que fue como una campaña prometida por la gente que lo está implementando. Nunca se mencionó hasta junio de 2021. No hubo consenso público. No hubo un estudio con diferentes partes de la sociedad. Como de la misma manera que la reserva federal está estudiando la posibilidad de un CBCD en los Estados Unidos.
Oscar Salguero:
Los salvadoreños no pidieron esto. No votaron por esto. Y parece ser que no es justo ir a cambiar la vida de millones de personas y jugar con su economía, sólo porque quieres que el número de Bitcoin suba. Así que si usted es un Bitcoiner por favor trate de hablar con un salvadoreño y pregunte lo que piensan, no sólo mirar los puntos de venta del gobierno.
Oscar Salguero:
Y hay muchos, es como una máquina de propaganda. Tienes que ver a través de eso. Y tratar de informarse bien y pensar en que hay millones de personas que han sido obligadas a utilizar esta herramienta, en este caso Bitcoin. Así que eso será lo más importante que creo que en este momento, debes saber. Seguiré haciendo mi trabajo y tratando de hacer llegar a la gente de El Salvador y Latinoamérica, en español, contándoles sobre todas las estafas y cosas malas que están pasando con las criptomonedas, NFTs y demás.
Oscar Salguero:
Y muchas gracias Cas y Bennett por recibirme. Y si queréis que vuelva, volveré. Será un placer. Muchas gracias.
Mario Gómez:
Sí. Tal vez lo que me gustaría decir es que nosotros, como salvadoreños, no tenemos forma de saber realmente cuál es el uso de los fondos públicos en el caso del Bitcoin. Es algo que no fue consultado con nadie en el país. Es algo que aparentemente salió de la familia de Bukele. Porque no sólo es Nayib, también son sus hermanos. Y el problema es que se trata de impuestos, es dinero de los impuestos de los salvadoreños que se está utilizando para apostar por el Bitcoin.
Mario Gómez:
Y creo que eso no es justo. No creo que nadie en ningún país, en particular en los EE.UU. acepte que un político tome el dinero de los contribuyentes para hacer una apuesta en algo como Bitcoin. Y creo que es una cosa importante que voy a señalar con respecto a todo esto. Y no tenemos ninguna manera de verificar el uso de los fondos públicos en El Salvador en este momento.
Cas Piancey:
Creo que ambos plantean puntos realmente convincentes. Y como estadounidenses, sólo puedo decir que las cosas que nos estáis expresando, para mí, me tocan muy de cerca en términos de: "Si esto estuviera ocurriendo aquí a gran escala, como estáis hablando, creo que no sólo yo estaría preocupado y Bennett estaría preocupado, sino que los estadounidenses en general estarían realmente preocupados por las cosas de las que estáis hablando". Así que creo que estás haciendo puntos muy importantes y convincentes. Y Dios, nos encantaría teneros de nuevo. Estoy deseando hablar de todo esto pronto. Está cambiando constantemente. La narrativa se está moviendo. Las historias están cambiando. Y quién sabe lo que el próximo mes o el próximo año va a traer. Así que espero con interés otra discusión. Esto ha sido muy esclarecedor. Así que muchas gracias a ambos.
Bennett Tomlin:
Sí, gracias. Ha sido fantástico hablar con ambos y obtener esta imagen más completa de cómo es la realidad de este proyecto.
Cas Piancey:
Hoy no hay ruegos desesperados. Estoy orgulloso de este episodio. Estoy muy agradecido de que Mario y Oscar hayan decidido unirse a nosotros en el podcast. Es más importante que la gente se entere de lo que pasa en El Salvador. Así que, por favor, comparte esto con alguien que conozcas, si es un maxi o si le preocupa la geopolítica. Gracias por escuchar.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.